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06 Jun 12 New Google Chrome Aims at Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/

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02 Jun 12 Google: Chrome's No. 1 (or 2) worldwide


The global browser numbers race between Chrome and Internet Explorer remains highly contested, but Google has sent the strongest signal yet that Chrome holds the crown as the Web browser leader.

Google Chrome senior vice president Sundar Pichai, speaking at D10, started off noting Chrome’s growth:

“Chrome grew roughly 300 percent last year — we have hundreds of millions of active users. We have many ways of looking at it. You can argue about the data, but in general I think we have gained substantial mindshare since we’ve launched the product.”

Amid the hedging, he went on (emphasis mine)::

“I think it’s fair to say that we are number one or number two in all countries in the world. It’s fair to say that roughly a third of people are using Chrome; I think it’s much more than a third in the consumer space. Most users in enterprise use IE because it takes a long time for that space to upgrade.”

Pichai added:

“There are places where our share is over 50 percent today. I think the speed of Chrome is much more notable when you have a slow connection.”

What could be seen as a bold statement could also be seen as a Dewey victory. Having said that, only Google knows exactly how many downloads it’s had for Chrome, but downloads do not equal installs or active use.

Plus, at least one browser counter suggests Chrome really is in the lead.

StatCounter said Chrome overtook Internet Explorer in May, even after it took into account a pre-rendering adjustment. The research firm said the move did not have any “significant” impact on its statistics.

It currently sees Internet Explorer at 32.12 percent, with Chrome a fraction ahead at 32.43 percent.

It’s also worth noting that it is not the first time Chrome has jumped ahead of Internet Explorer, according to the analytics firm. Chrome was the “world’s top browser” for a single day on March 18. It’s likely the figure jumped on the Sunday because the vast majority were at home and not at the office, where Internet Explorer still dominates the work environment.

But it doesn’t mean Internet Explorer can’t recoup its losses and claw back the market share it’s losing.

On the flip side, Net Applications pegs Internet Explorer at 54 percent with
Firefox ahead of Chrome at 19.7 percent and 19.6 percent respectively.

Microsoft was unavailable for comment at the time of writing.

Transcript courtesy of Engadget.

See also from D10:
• Google’s Pichai predicts Chrome OS, Android convergence
• Google execs on piracy: It’s not a technical problem

This story originally appeared at ZDNet’s Between the Lines under the headline “Google says Chrome is slamming IE’s market share.”

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57445256-93/google-chromes-no-1-or-2-worldwide/?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-20

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01 Jun 12 Chrome or IE? Who Won the May Browser Wars?


Web browsers continued to play a game of thrones last month, but which one took the Internet crown?

Who is king seems up for debate: StatCounter placed Google Chrome at the top of the heap in May, the first time the browser dominated for a full calendar month. Net Applications, however, still had IE as the top browser, followed by Firefox and Chrome.

For May, StatCounter’s data showed more than 15 billion Internet page views — Chrome took 32.43 percent of the worldwide market, compared to 32.12 percent for IE, and 25.55 percent for Firefox.

But Chrome is ringing in June with a barely there global edge on IE, according to StatCounter, which reported that a 0.6 percent switch from IE to Firefox helped push Chrome into first place. May’s Chrome update to the new, stable version of the Google browser is likely a contributing factor, as well.

Net Applications, meanwhile, showed Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome neck-and-neck, separated for second and third places, respectively, by 0.13 percent. IE still reigned supreme at 54.05 percent global market share, according to the site.

In the U.S., Net Applications calculated the Microsoft browser at 56.13 percent for May, while Firefox and Chrome lagged behind with 16.78 percent and 14.48 percent, respectively.

The vast difference in the numbers from Net Applications and StatCounter are primarily due to the use of unique visitors instead of page views, Net Applications spokesman Vince Vizzaccaro wrote in an email.

He indicated that country-level weighting is likely the biggest factor, adding that IE has a very strong market share in the U.S. and China, which carry the largest bases of Internet users.

The fight between stat counters doesn’t mean much to Google, though.

During the D10 expo, Chrome’s senior vice president, Sundar Pichai, said that the browser grew about 300 percent last year, with “hundreds of millions of active users,” according to Engadget.

“We have many ways of looking at it,” he said. “You can argue about the data, but in general I think we have gained substantial mindshare since we’ve launched the product.”

For more, see PCMag’s full reviews of IE9 (slideshow below), Chrome 18, and Firefox 12.

For more from Stephanie, follow her on Twitter @smlotPCMag.


View Slideshow
See all (21) slides


Start Installation


About Box


First Look at IE9


Gear Menu


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405170,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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01 Jun 12 Chrome or IE? Who Won the May Browser Wars?


Web browsers continued to play a game of thrones last month, but which one took the Internet crown?

Who is king seems up for debate: StatCounter placed Google Chrome at the top of the heap in May, the first time the browser dominated for a full calendar month. Net Applications, however, still had IE as the top browser, followed by Firefox and Chrome.

For May, StatCounter’s data showed more than 15 billion Internet page views — Chrome took 32.43 percent of the worldwide market, compared to 32.12 percent for IE, and 25.55 percent for Firefox.

But Chrome is ringing in June with a barely there global edge on IE, according to StatCounter, which reported that a 0.6 percent switch from IE to Firefox helped push Chrome into first place. May’s Chrome update to the new, stable version of the Google browser is likely a contributing factor, as well.

Net Applications, meanwhile, showed Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome neck-and-neck, separated for second and third places, respectively, by 0.13 percent. IE still reigned supreme at 54.05 percent global market share, according to the site.

In the U.S., Net Applications calculated the Microsoft browser at 56.13 percent for May, while Firefox and Chrome lagged behind with 16.78 percent and 14.48 percent, respectively.

The fight between stat counters doesn’t mean much to Google, though.

During the D10 expo, Chrome’s senior vice president, Sundar Pichai, said that the browser grew about 300 percent last year, with “hundreds of millions of active users,” according to Engadget.

“We have many ways of looking at it,” he said. “You can argue about the data, but in general I think we have gained substantial mindshare since we’ve launched the product.”

For more, see PCMag’s full reviews of IE9 (slideshow below), Chrome 18, and Firefox 12.

For more from Stephanie, follow her on Twitter @smlotPCMag.


View Slideshow
See all (21) slides


Start Installation


About Box


First Look at IE9


Gear Menu


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405170,00.asp

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29 May 12 Bits Blog: New Google Chrome Aims at Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/?partner=rss&emc=rss

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29 May 12 New Google Chrome Aims At Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/

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26 May 12 Business Apps Are Becoming Integrated with Google Drive


Business Apps Are Becoming Integrated with Google Drive

by Sam Dean – May. 25, 2012Comments (0)

Recently, Google introduced its Google Drive cloud storage service, and with it you can sign up for 5GB of free cloud storage, and use it efficiently with your Android device. We’ve also made the point that Google Drive will provide a form of rescue for Google’s Chrome OS, which has been criticized by some for its cloud-centric focus and inflexibility with standard kinds of storage. By filling the storage gap in Chrome OS, Google can appeal to enterprise users with incentives for free Google Drive storage in the cloud in combination with Chrome OS. And now, it’s clear from the ecosystem that is taking shape around Google Drive that that is a point of focus for Google.

Already, partnerships focused on business users are cropping up around Google Drive. For example, RightSignature, which offers ways to get documents completed and signed online, has announced an integration with Google Drive. The integration with RightSignature means users can send documents stored in Google Drive for an e-signature with a few clicks. When the online signature is completed, signed documents are automatically saved in Google Drive. This is clearly aimed at business users. Think of how a real estate agent might use the service.

Syncdocs is another service that has announced integration with Google Drive, where business users are the target market. With Syncdocs, users can right click on any file or folder and have it synced online. Sharing files and folders to other Google Drive users is a one-step process. Syncdocs is free, but if you sync a large number of files, as business users might, then fees kick in. 

It’s inevitable that Google Drive will become integrated with more business utilities and that these integrated offerings will help Google appeal to enterprises with the combination of Chrome OS and Google Drive. 

Sure enough, Sundar Pichai, the Googler who manages development of Chrome OS as well as the Google Apps online services, has confirmed that Google will closely integrate Google Drive online storage with an upcoming version of the Chrome OS operating system. Wired reports this:

“Basically, Google Drive — a service that operates on the web — will perform as if it was the local file system. If you open the ‘save file’ dialog box on Chrome OS, for instance, the system will take you straight to Google Drive. “We’ll…effectively integrate [Google] Drive into the native file system of Chrome OS,” says Scott Johnson, Google’s Google Drive product manager. “All the core OS functionality will use [Google] Drive as a place to store data — if that’s what you opt in to.”

Many people who have written Chromebooks off, and many people who think Google Drive is just an entertainment play, should take note of this, as well as the new business-focused services taking shape around Google Drive. One of the barriers to adoption for Chrome OS so far has been that it is not designed to work with locally stored data and apps. Instead, it concentrates everything on the cloud. But with Google Drive, users have a free and obvious way–and a way provided by Google–to marry storage, data and applications with use of Google’s operating system.

Look for Google and the companies integrating their utilities and applications with Google Drive to start offering incentives to enterprises that want free Google Drive storage and might be willing to use Chrome OS, Chromebooks and more. The storage will be free, but the whole bundle won’t necessarily be so.

  • cloud computing
  • Chrome OS
  • chromebooks
  • Google Drive
  • Syncdocs
  • RightSignature

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Article source: http://ostatic.com/blog/business-apps-are-becoming-integrated-with-google-drive

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25 Apr 12 Google Set to Meld GDrive With Chrome OS


Google senior vice president Sundar Pichai says the GDrive will soon be integrated with the company’s Chrome OS operating system. Image: Flickr/niallkennedy

Google will tightly integrate its new Google Drive online storage service with an upcoming version of its Chrome OS operating system, according to Sundar Pichai, the man who oversees development of the company’s Chrome products as well as its Google Apps online services.

Chrome OS is Google’s effort to move all applications and data onto the web. First released last year on “Chromebook” laptops from Acer and Samsung, this lightweight operating system revolves around a single local application: Google’s Chrome browser. The idea is to streamline the way we use, update, and secure our laptop and desktop machines, and though it succeeds in some cases, the OS still hasn’t mastered the art of moving files from place to place.

By integrating Chrome OS with Google Drive — the online storage service Google introduced on Tuesday — the company seeks to correct this problem. “With Chromebooks, [Google Drive] is even more powerful,” Pichai says, “because it just starts working naturally. Your local drive is also Google Drive. This makes it really powerful because you just don’t think about it.”

Basically, Google Drive — a service that operates on the web — will perform as if it was the local file system. If you open the ‘save file’ dialog box on Chrome OS, for instance, the system will take you straight to Google Drive. “We’ll…effectively integrate [Google] Drive into the native file system of Chrome OS,” says Scott Johnson, Google’s Google Drive product manager. “All the core OS functionality will use [Google] Drive as a place to store data — if that’s what you opt in to.”

According to Pichai and Johnson, Google Drive will integrate will version 20 of Chrome OS. An early incarnation of version 19 is currently under test, prior to its official release.

The long-rumored GDrive is an online service where you can upload, share, and collaborate on files, including documents, videos, photos, and PDFs. It’s available to consumers, but it’s also part of the Google Apps suite of online applications the company offers to businesses.

The service is similar to what Google has long provided as part of its Google Docs online word processor — it even looks the same — but in moving file storage to a new service, Google is looking to facilitate the transfer of files between all sorts of online applications, including its own services as well as those run by third parties.

VMware’s SlideRocket — an online service for building slide presentations a la Microsoft PowerPoint — is among a handful of third-party services that already tie into Google Drive. The appeal of GDrive, says Chuck Dietrich, who oversees SlideRocket at VMware, is that you can open files directly from the service. “When you open a document, you can immediately start editing,” he says. “They have their own editing tool, but they also have integration with other tools like SlideRocket.”

Other storage services, such as Box.net, are moving towards in a similar direction, so Google Drive is not unique in this sense. But this does make it a good fit for Chrome OS. Because the OS does not run local applications, you’re forced to shuttle files between online apps, and even when you have an effective local file interface, this can be difficult. You end up uploading files and then downloading them and then uploading them again.

When Google unveiled an early version of Chrome OS in December 2010, it offered no obvious way for users to access files stored on the machine itself. By the time the OS hit the market, it included a rudimentary file viewer, but moving files was still quite difficult.

Currently, Google offers downloadable software that tie Google Drive to the file systems of other desktop OSes, including Apple’s Mac OS X, letting you synchronize files across multiple machines. But with Chrome, this sort of software will be part of the OS itself.

As recounted in Steven’s Levy’s In the Plex, Google was on the verge of releasing a GDrive storage service several years ago, but Sundar Pichai was among the Googlers who were against launching the service — apparently because it was little more than a way of storing files. “The point I made was that files — in and of themselves — don’t matter,” Pichai remembers. “What matters is applications.”

But the new GDrive, he says, takes a different tack. “This version of GDrive is deeply tied to how we think about Google Docs,” he says. “The focus is on applications — powerful applications — that let people live and work in the cloud, create and collaborate. We started by letting people upload files to Google Docs, and GDrive is an evolution of this. It’s a place where you go to create and collaborate and share documents…Users are not just looking for file systems and storage.”

Soon, Google Drive will bring this approach to Chrome OS. And it’s needed.

Article source: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/04/google-gdrive-chrome-os/

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25 Apr 12 Chrome for Android to come out of beta ‘in weeks’


Chrome for Android overlays multiple tabs if you tap the tab button in the upper right.

Chrome for Android overlays multiple tabs if you tap the tab button in the upper right.

(Credit:
screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET)

Google expects to bring its Chrome browser for
Android out of beta testing “in a matter of weeks.”

So said Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Chrome and Apps, in an interview yesterday, shortly after Google released a Chrome for Android update that lets people view the desktop version of a Web page and add bookmarks to the browser’s home screen.

“We launched beta 2. We addressed a few things,” Pichai said. “Mainly right now, I’m driven by bug quality and stability. We are triaging, tracking, and trying to make it very stable. It is in a matter of weeks.”

Google released the first Chrome for Android beta in February.

The browser has been well received, but it only runs on devices that use Android 4.0, aka Ice Cream Sandwich. Even though Google released the Android 4.0 source code in November, ICS phones still remain a relative rarity in the marketplace.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57420309-93/chrome-for-android-to-come-out-of-beta-in-weeks/

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25 Apr 12 Chrome for Android to come out of beta 'in weeks'


Chrome for Android overlays multiple tabs if you tap the tab button in the upper right.

Chrome for Android overlays multiple tabs if you tap the tab button in the upper right.

(Credit:
screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET)

Google expects to bring its Chrome browser for
Android out of beta testing “in a matter of weeks.”

So said Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Chrome and Apps, in an interview yesterday, shortly after Google released a Chrome for Android update that lets people view the desktop version of a Web page and add bookmarks to the browser’s home screen.

“We launched beta 2. We addressed a few things,” Pichai said. “Mainly right now, I’m driven by bug quality and stability. We are triaging, tracking, and trying to make it very stable. It is in a matter of weeks.”

Google released the first Chrome for Android beta in February.

The browser has been well received, but it only runs on devices that use Android 4.0, aka Ice Cream Sandwich. Even though Google released the Android 4.0 source code in November, ICS phones still remain a relative rarity in the marketplace.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57420309-93/chrome-for-android-to-come-out-of-beta-in-weeks/?part=rss&subj=androidatlas&tag=title

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