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27 Dec 12 Google Play store lists ‘Best Apps of 2012′


Sameer Mitha

The list, according to Google, “These represents “some of the best apps available in Google Play. Some launched in 2012 while others issued updates that achieved a great combination of utility, beauty and accessibility. Almost all of them are available globally and offer a great user experience on both tablets and phones. From excellent tools to objects of beauty, each of these applications represents the best of Google Play.”

Google hasn’t assigned any particular rating to these apps and they aren’t listed in any chronological order either. The list of apps includes the following:

Evernote (Free): Stay on top of every element of your life, from anywhere. Take notes, capture photos and record memos with this amazing organizer.

Pinterest (Free): Take full advantage of your android device and set pins from anywhere using the built-in sharing system. Share and enjoy!

Grimm’s Snow White (Rs. 105): A deceptively simple and well-executed storybook that serves as a perfect introduction to the world of Grimm’s fairy tales.

Pocket (Free): A full-featured offline reader that is constantly adding new capabilities like site subscriptions that let you save articles on paid sites.

EXPEDIA HOTELS FLIGHTS (Free): A beautiful and well-designed app that sets the bar for globally relevant travel tools with a rich and detailed tablet experience.

Ancestry (Free): A unique and full-featured genealogy app that delivered a stunning design overhaul which also delivered new functionality.

Fancy (Free): Fancy lets you share your personal style with style and brings a fresh perspective to the worlds of online shopping and fashion.

Seriesguide Show Manager (Free): Enjoy a great second-screen experience for TV that features an attractive, practical and well-planned design aesthetic.

Pixlr Express (Free): A relatively new photography app that provides an amazing array of editing and photo-correction tools for both phones and tablets.

TED (Free): Enjoy talks and lectures from some of the world’s most fascinating mavericks, gurus and legends.

It’s a little startling to see that none of the mainstream social networking apps such as Facebook or Twitter have made it to the list. What do you thing about this list? Is there any app you wish had made it? Let us know your favourite Android app in the comment section below.

Article source: http://www.thinkdigit.com/Apps/Google-Play-store-lists-Best-Apps-of_12836.html

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27 Dec 12 Google Play Music censors your uploaded songs – Pocket


Google Play Music censors your uploaded songs . Google, google music, Google Play 0

27 December 2012 10:43 GMT / By Ian Morris



The Americans, rightly or wrongly have a bit of a reputation for being a puritanical lot – no swearing on network TV and nothing more than a hint of side boob. But the discovery that Google Play music is switching out your explicit music for censored stuff is a bit much for us to bear.

Reports online today suggest that for “some” users, if you upload a track with swearing, and it’s the match service that does the upload, then you’ll get the censored, clean version. We tested the service with our copy of Eminem’s Guilty Conscience. It did, indeed, return the clean version when we played the track through the web interface.

This seems especially stupid, as the track we uploaded was explicit, which means we’d made the decision to buy music with swearing in the first place. Presumably, we wouldn’t have done this if we’d been offended by the torrent of filthy words for which Eminem is famous. 

Google’s Match service – which identifies the song you’re uploading, and matches it with tracks already stored in Google’s cloud-based service – launched first in Europe in early November. The US got the service this month.

If we were going to cut Google a break here – we’re not – then we could suggest that it’s probably better it does this than risk having the explicit track turn up in some poor kiddie’s library by mistake. But the truth is, no one cares about swearing in songs other than broadcasters. If you want to listen to Eminem’s Guilty Conscience then you want to hear all the words. Otherwise the damn song doesn’t make any “scratching noise” sense.

Surely, in this day and age, if Google wanted to offer an option to only allow censored music – perhaps at the behest of parents – then it would be simple to either opt in, or opt out of that system? But perhaps most baffling of all, Google itself allows you to buy explicit tracks via its own store. So what the “blank space” is that all about?

Does this **** you right off? Please feel free to comment below, although we might delete the ones with swearing. 


Via: droid-life.com

Google, google music, Google Play

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Article source: http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/48894/google-play-music-censors-your-music

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18 Dec 12 Eric Schmidt interviews Stephen Colbert and talks Google Play


One of my favorite late night TV hosts Stephen Colbert from The Colbert Report is in the Android news world today after being interviewed by Google’s own Eric Schmidt. As I’m sure many of you know (or don’t) Colbert is known for his outrageous comedy and talks of politics, interviews with celebrities and more. Today however in a comedy skit Colbert takes a stop by Google‘s NY headquarters to be interviewed by Google Chairman Eric Schmidt, and it’s certainly worth a watch.

Screen Shot 2012-12-17 at 2.27.54 PM

We won’t be talking Android here too much, nor about his Super PAC, but instead about Stephen Colbert’s new book. For comedy sakes he takes some funny and laugh filled questions from Google employees as he and Schmidt try to keep a straight face, and it’s quite enjoyable. For those that watch The Colbert Report regularly this will be funny, for everyone else — he’s a little odd.

The video below is about an hour long, so you can enjoy it if you choose but the fun part here being that Eric Schmidt took a few opportunities to talk about Android, the Google Play Store, and bash Apple at the same time. Something we’ve been seeing from Schmidt a lot as of late. At times I wish he’d stop interrupting and trying to be funny, but he did quite well considering Colbert does this nightly. The good stuff starts about 8 minutes in.

Eric Schmidt mentioned “I should not turn this into an Android commercial,” but after a few moments he got his plugs in where possible. Schmidt used the moment to talk up Android over Apple, and that one rainforest company (Amazon). Stating Android is currently “five times bigger than the iPhone.” The funny interview was all about Stephen Colbert’s new book (don’t ask) but Google’s chairman took that moment to attack Apple too. Mentioning that offering his new book “in the Google Play Store people will actually be reading your book.”

They briefly made jokes about Android, Google, the Nexus 7 and a few other things so it certainly is worth a watch if you’re a fan of Android or The Colbert Report. Hit the links below to see everything Eric Schmidt’s had to say lately regarding Android and Apple.

[via AllThingsD]

Article source: http://androidcommunity.com/eric-schmidt-interviews-stephen-colbert-and-talks-google-play-20121217/

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18 Dec 12 Google Launches “Surprise Calendar” In Google Play To Give Away Free And …


Google today launched the first deal in what will be a series of freebies and discounts on mobile apps, books, TV, music and movies, now being made available to Android users via Google Play. The “surprise calendar countdown,” as the giveaway program is being called, kicks off with a $35 credit for Hotel Tonight.

Programs in the past have offered discounted apps as limited time offers. For example, last year’s celebration saw 10 apps offered for 10 cents for 10 days during the month of December, in celebration of Android reaching 10 billion downloads.

However, with this year’s surprise calendar countdown, it seems Google is actually working with some of the companies themselves in order to offer free or discounted content instead. For this debut deal, users have to first download the Hotel Tonight application, but can then receive a $35 discount towards their hotel stay by using a special promo code (Google35).

No other details on what the future deals will involve, beyond the fact that they will expand beyond apps to also include the other media and music content hosted on Google Play. The promotion runs from now until January 1st, 2013.

We’re reaching out to Google to get more info, as it’s unclear at this time if the deals are U.S.-only, and will update when we hear back.

Article source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/12/17/google-launches-surprise-calendar-in-google-play-to-give-away-free-and-discounted-apps-music-movies-more/

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16 Jun 12 Why Android’s Greatest Threat Isn’t Apple – It’s Microsoft


There’s little denying that Apple rules the smartphone world. The company sells just one phone model, yet that sole model constitutes 8.8% – or roughly 1 in 11 – of all worldwide smartphone sales and 73% of profits. iOS is the second most popular smartphone OS in the US after Android with 31.4% of the market (Android has 50.8%). Windows Phone 7, on the other hand, has just 4% of the US smartphone market, yet it’s Microsoft that we have to worry about. We’re witnessing a Kansas City Shuffle; while everybody is looking left, Microsoft is going right.

Microsoft is a lot like a freight train: it may be fat, bloated, and heavy, but once it finally gets up to speed, it’s a force to be reckoned with. There’s certainly something to be said for a company that commands about 90% of the US PC market and 40% of the US console market at a time when consoles are becoming less gamey and more comprehensive-entertainment-centery. That’s without touching on Microsoft’s impending entrance in the tablet game and the upcoming release of Windows RT and Windows 8, nor the early 2013 release of the Xbox 720.

By now, you can probably see where I’m going with this. Odds are very good that your home and work computers both run Windows, and I’m going to guess you use Office on both. Roughly 30 million Xbox 360s have been sold in the US, so I’m going to guess that a fair number of readers may have one of those too. That’s our foundation: the company already has a commanding presence in many corners of consumers’ lives.

But it’s still a bit of a mess. Sure, the 360 has some networked PC integration built in, but any UI or UX consistency between the two is an afterthought, not a perfect fit. Yes, you can use Office on your Windows Phone, but it’s not a great experience. What happens when it all comes together, as the company is doing with its next wave of devices? Windows Phone looks like Windows RT, which looks like Windows 8. I’ll eat my shoes if the 720 doesn’t share the same design language.

wp7-people WinRTTab Win8pc

Left to right: Windows Phone 7, Windows RT (tablet), Windows 8 (PC). Without the subtitle, would you know which was which?

All three of the above, as well as the Xbox 720, show extreme promise. Now stop and consider: what can be done if virtually every internet-connected aspect of your life shares the same platform? Apps can easily be ported, streaming/transferring/syncing could be a breeze, the cloud could be more powerful than ever, and your portable devices can be windows (hah!) into a bigger screen. Your phone and tablet can act as seamless companions to your TV or PC, becoming a complementing screen for auxiliary information or a unique controllers. It’s a lot more fun to play a racing game on your phone or tablet than it is on your PC because you actually have to interact, but you’re still limited to a small screen. Imagine that same interactivity but on your PC or TV screen. The Wii U is child’s play by comparison.

Obviously, there’s a big catch here, and it’s one of MSFT’s most infamous weaknesses: they have to follow through. A lack of corporate focus has often resulted in poor quality for the company in the past, and products/services with a world of potential have been absolutely ruined by a lack of attention to detail. Bill Gates famously sent an email to his senior people absolutely slamming Windows Usability – seriously, it’s like 2 pages long and describes how excruciating Microsoft can make user experience.

Lately, though, the company has been doing pretty damn well, and as previously mentioned, their upcoming products and services show a world of potential. While I don’t think Microsoft’s next wave will be perfect out of the gate, I think they will be impressive enough to drive growth across the board.

Google and Apple offer fantastic products and services, but they don’t command your den, your office, your living room, and your productivity. That’s Microsoft’s Trojan Horse, and that’s why it’s the biggest threat to Android.

Article source: http://www.androidpolice.com/2012/06/16/why-androids-greatest-threat-isnt-apple-its-microsoft/

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12 Jun 12 Samsung Chromebox: Chrome OS meets the desktop


When we think of Chrome OS, most of us think of the Chromebook — the custom laptop built to run Google’s cloud-centric platform. Now, though, the Chromebook has a new friend: the Chromebox, Google’s first attempt at bringing cloud computing into the world of desktop PCs.

The Chromebox, manufactured by Samsung and available for $329, is exactly what you’d expect: Chrome OS in a box. A small box, too: The Chromebox is a square 7.6 inches that sits just 1.3 inches tall. But inside that box sits a large amount of power.

Chromebox and Chrome OS: The need for speed

In case you haven’t been following along, I’ve been using Chrome OS for the bulk of my computing needs these past several days. It’s part of my two-week Chrome OS experiment; I wanted to immerse myself in Google’s latest hardware and software advances in order to get the full experience of what it’s like to use Chrome OS in the real world.

The Chromebox is an important part of that experience. While most users veer toward the portable Chrome OS configuration, the Chromebox is a natural step forward from there — for business and education users, for sure, but also for more casual Chrome OS converts who are ready to ditch their old operating systems and move completely into Google’s cloud-centric universe.

Like with the Chromebook, the first thing you notice about the Chromebox is how fast and simple it is to use. The Chromebox powers up in about four to five seconds; once you type in your Google credentials, it’s literally another second or two until you’re sitting in a browser window, online and ready to go — no cumbersome setup required. If you use Chrome (the browser) anywhere else, all of your bookmarks, settings, and extensions will automatically be synced and waiting for you. You’ll even see your most recent open tabs from other Chrome-connected devices — both PCs and Android phones/tablets.

The Chromebox runs on a dual-core 1.9GHz Intel Celeron processor along with 4GB of RAM, giving it more than enough horsepower to keep up with your tasks. The lag and sluggishness we saw with the first generation of Chrome OS devices is gone; the Chromebox is as snappy and speedy as the latest Chromebook, and even with dozens of tabs open, I didn’t encounter a single stutter or slowdown.

Chromebox connectivity

Samsung’s Chromebox has six (!) USB 2.0 ports — four on the back and two on the front — along with two DisplayPort++ connectors and a DVI output. It’s lacking a regular VGA monitor port, however, which could give you trouble if you’re using that type of cable — even with an adaptor. Chrome OS automatically detects and adjusts your screen resolution, and at this point, there’s no way to manually tweak that setting. When I tried connecting a monitor using a VGA cable with a VGA-to-DVI adaptor, the system failed to get the resolution right and gave me a blown-up, low-res display. When I switched to a straight DVI cable, everything worked correctly.

The Chromebox can connect to your TV via HDMI; you’ll just need the right cable to make it work. The device has no standard HDMI outport, so you’ll have to use either the DVI or DisplayPort connector to set things up.

One beef I have with the current Chrome OS display situation is the lack of support for a dual-monitor, extended-desktop configuration. Particularly on the desktop PC front, I like working with two monitors. The Chromebox can support multiple monitors, but right now, it only allows you to duplicate your display on the second monitor — which isn’t terribly useful. A Google rep tells me extended-desktop functionality is on the way, but there’s no definite time frame for its arrival just yet.

The Chromebox doesn’t come with any special accessories, so you’ll supply your own keyboard and mouse. (The system is Bluetooth 3.0 compatible, so you can go wireless if you want.) Google has confirmed to me that a Chrome OS-specific keyboard — known for its unique layout and stylewill be sold as a separate accessory, but there’s no word yet when it’ll become available.

With the desktop setup, though, having a Chrome OS-specific keyboard isn’t really necessary. Any regular keyboard works fine, and most of the Chrome OS-specific functions map over to the standard layout seamlessly: The F1 key acts as a “back” button, for example, while F4 toggles windows from full-screen to partial-screen mode.

The Chromebox experience

In general, I’ve found it quite pleasant to use Google’s Chromebox computer. Chrome OS translates nicely into the desktop environment, and for the most part, it’s been a novel and refreshing change from my typical Windows 7 desktop environment.

In the morning, for example, the Chromebox has me online in about 10 seconds flat; three or four minutes later, my Windows system is almost booted up and done loading its numerous drivers and background processes. Chrome OS does away with all the hassles of the traditional operating system, from drivers and complicated compatibility issues to cumbersome software updates and virus infection worries. And thanks to the nature of the system, it doesn’t get progressively slower and more bogged down over time. I don’t know about you, but that’s all very welcome news to me.

(For much more on the software side of the experience, see my in-depth look at the latest incarnation of Chrome OS.)

Android Power TwitterStill, the setup isn’t perfect — and it certainly isn’t for everyone. In the final chapter of my Chrome OS experiment, I’ll wrap up my two weeks living with Chrome OS and attempt to reach some final conclusions. I’ll bring together the good and the bad of both Google’s new hardware and evolved software and weigh it all out with the prices of the devices.

The Chrome OS experiment ends in two days. Until then, you can catch up on the rest of my journey in the box below:

Article source: http://blogs.computerworld.com/cloud-computing/20498/samsung-chromebox-chrome-os-desktop

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12 Jun 12 Google polishes Chrome OS


A year ago, I wrote that the first Chromebooks felt more like a science project than a strategic product. They were interesting but of little practical value. A lot has changed since then, and while I wouldn’t say that Google has developed a truly compelling device, it has shown that the Chromebook and its underlying Chrome OS are evolving.

Chrome OS is Google’s attempt to create a new class of Web-based operating system, designed to work on special devices, the first of which were last year’s Chromebooks. Since then, Google has refreshed Chrome OS (the actual version number is 19) and with partner Samsung has introduced both a new Chromebook and a desktop device called Chromebox. After using both for the last few weeks, my impression is that Google did a nice job of polishing Chrome in ways that help it shine much better than it did a year ago.

The new Chromebook, called the Series 5, has a 12.1-inch display and 16GB of built-in flash storage. You can add a Verizon Wireless 3G radio, with 100MB free per month for two years. There’s a much-improved trackpad (the trackpad on the first Chromebooks was all but unusable), and the device is now powered by an Intel Celeron processor, which dramatically improves performance, especially for things like streaming high-definition video. Pricing is $449 for the Wi-Fi-only version and $549 for the 3G models.

The Chromebox Series 3 is a small, sleek box that takes some design cues from the Mac Mini. It has the same CPU and memory as the Chromebook. It doesn’t include a monitor, keyboard or mouse, but it has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth support for keyboards and mice, along with DVI and HDMI output. It costs $329.99.

Both devices are good-looking and solid pieces of hardware, though I’d argue that 3.3 pounds is too much weight for a laptop that isn’t really a laptop at all. I could give you more specs, but specs don’t have that much to do with what you’re buying here. What really matters is the updated Chrome OS experience, and the newest version shows just what a difference a year makes.

One of the biggest drawbacks of Chrome OS was that an offline Chromebook was pretty much a brick with a monitor. Google has worked to address that, adding offline access for Google Docs and Gmail. Both are a little rough around the edges, but they do work. Originally, Google eschewed the idea of a file system in its operating system, but it has now abandoned that stance. The current version of Chrome OS is integrated with Google Drive, giving users a convenient way to access, store and sync content across devices, including PCs, Macs, smartphones and, of course, Chrome.

Chrome OS can’t do everything a PC or Mac can do, and I doubt that Google wants it to. But in the past year, the company seems to have recognized that users who invest in a Chromebook (or now a Chromebox) are going to expect to be able to do the same things they do on PCs and Macs. Google’s response to that problem has been to integrate remote PC access directly into Chrome OS. This feature is still in beta, but I was able to test the latest version and had no problem connecting to my office Mac and working with it remotely. This feature amounts to a big deal, since it removes a major impediment to adoption.

Because the Chromebox supports HDMI output, I thought it might be fun to connect it to my TV set. It worked rather well. Unlike Google TV, none of my browser content was blocked, and I had full access to sites like Hulu, Netflix and all the major networks. As far as those sites were concerned, there was nothing to block. I’m a skeptic when it comes to Web browsing on a TV set, but the Chromebox does make it easy if that’s what you want to do.

As they stand now, the Chromebook and Chromebox are transitional. They point toward potential that could eventually make them good choices for a lot of people who have embraced the concept of the personal cloud and for whom a PC is but one device among many. It’s a lot easier now than it was a year ago to see how a Chromebook or Chromebox could become a user’s additional screen.

But the price of these machines is going to have to come down for that to happen, and the hardware probably has to move even beyond the slimmed-down aesthetics of ultrabooks. The current versions of both hardware and software do suggest, though, that Google is going to keep trying to get there.

Michael Gartenberg is a research director at Gartner. The opinions expressed are his own. Follow him on Twitter @Gartenberg.

Article source: http://www.cio.com.au/article/427230/google_polishes_chrome_os/?utm_medium=rss&utm_source=sectionfeed

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11 Jun 12 Another Look at Chrome


A year ago, I wrote that the first Chromebooks felt more like a science project than a strategic product. They were interesting but of little practical value. A lot has changed since then, and while I wouldn’t say that Google has developed a truly compelling device, it has shown that the Chromebook and its underlying Chrome OS are evolving.

Chrome OS is Google’s attempt to create a new class of Web-based operating system, designed to work on special devices, the first of which were last year’s Chromebooks. Since then, Google has refreshed Chrome OS (the actual version number is 19) and with partner Samsung has introduced both a new Chromebook and a desktop device called Chromebox. After using both for the last few weeks, my impression is that Google did a nice job of polishing Chrome in ways that help it shine much better than it did a year ago.

The new Chromebook, called the Series 5, has a 12.1-inch display and 16GB of built-in flash storage. You can add a Verizon Wireless 3G radio, with 100MB free per month for two years. There’s a much-improved trackpad (the trackpad on the first Chromebooks was all but unusable), and the device is now powered by an Intel Celeron processor, which dramatically improves performance, especially for things like streaming high-definition video. Pricing is $449 for the Wi-Fi-only version and $549 for the 3G models.

The Chromebox Series 3 is a small, sleek box that takes some design cues from the Mac Mini. It has the same CPU and memory as the Chromebook. It doesn’t include a monitor, keyboard or mouse, but it has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth support for keyboards and mice, along with DVI and HDMI output. It costs $329.99.

Both devices are good-looking and solid pieces of hardware, though I’d argue that 3.3 pounds is too much weight for a laptop that isn’t really a laptop at all. I could give you more specs, but specs don’t have that much to do with what you’re buying here. What really matters is the updated Chrome OS experience, and the newest version shows just what a difference a year makes.

Addressing Drawbacks, Looking Forward

One of the biggest drawbacks of Chrome OS was that an offline Chromebook was pretty much a brick with a monitor. Google has worked to address that, adding offline access for Google Docs and Gmail. Both are a little rough around the edges, but they do work. Originally, Google eschewed the idea of a file system in its operating system, but it has now abandoned that stance. The current version of Chrome OS is integrated with Google Drive, giving users a convenient way to access, store and sync content across devices, including PCs, Macs, smartphones and, of course, Chrome.

Chrome OS can’t do everything a PC or Mac can do, and I doubt that Google wants it to. But in the past year, the company seems to have recognized that users who invest in a Chromebook (or now a Chromebox) are going to expect to be able to do the same things they do on PCs and Macs. Google’s response to that problem has been to integrate remote PC access directly into Chrome OS. This feature is still in beta, but I was able to test the latest version and had no problem connecting to my office Mac and working with it remotely. This feature amounts to a big deal, since it removes a major impediment to adoption.

Because the Chromebox supports HDMI output, I thought it might be fun to connect it to my TV set. It worked rather well. Unlike Google TV, none of my browser content was blocked, and I had full access to sites like Hulu, Netflix and all the major networks. As far as those sites were concerned, there was nothing to block. I’m a skeptic when it comes to Web browsing on a TV set, but the Chromebox does make it easy if that’s what you want to do.

As they stand now, the Chromebook and Chromebox are transitional. They point toward potential that could eventually make them good choices for a lot of people who have embraced the concept of the personal cloud and for whom a PC is but one device among many. It’s a lot easier now than it was a year ago to see how a Chromebook or Chromebox could become a user’s additional screen.

But the price of these machines is going to have to come down for that to happen, and the hardware probably has to move even beyond the slimmed-down aesthetics of ultrabooks. The current versions of both hardware and software do suggest, though, that Google is going to keep trying to get there.

Michael Gartenberg is a research director at Gartner. The opinions expressed are his own. Follow him on Twitter @Gartenberg.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257304/another_look_at_chrome.html

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09 Jun 12 Infinitec Unveils Pocket TV, an Android 4.0 Based HDMI Micro-Computer that …


Pocket TV, a fully functioning Android 4.0 thumb sized micro-computer for your HDTV now available for pre-order on KickStarter

Infinitec, a breakthrough startup company lead by a small team of engineers, programmers and designers, announces the Pocket TV, an Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) based HDMI dongle that converts any TV into a Smart TV. The Pocket TV, one of the world’s smallest computers, operates as a fully functioning micro-computer the size of your thumb with a processing power that will allow you to display Android on your TV turning it into a mega-sized tablet.

You can download apps from the Google Play Store to stream videos, play games, connect with your friends on Facebook, catch up on news, do some work or simply surf the web. You can even attach a video camera to do Skype video-calls on your TV.
Watch a video of it in action by clicking here:

The Pocket TV is so small that you can conveniently take it anywhere you go, including trips abroad. When you get to your destination, hotel room or office you can easily plug it into any monitor or TV and you will get access to all your information, games, TV streaming channels, work documents and your entire digital life. The Pocket TV is also a great accessory for business professionals as it eliminates the need to carry a heavy laptop. All you need to do is plug the Pocket TV into the projector and your presentation can be played from the cloud (like a Dropbox account) or locally from the SD Card.

“Our motivation to create the Pocket TV was that we found ourselves with too many gadgets. Nowadays we had a smartphone, a tablet and a laptop and we thought wouldn’t it be great to have one small portable solution that did what all these gadgets do but on a big screen TV,” says Ahmad Zahran, Founder of Infinitec. “Pocket TV will give users a simple solution to accessing their digital life, surfing the internet, streaming video, playing games, doing video-conferences and much more from anywhere and on any TV or monitor. Unlike with smartphones and tablets they will be able to do all this on a large screen with something that literally fits into their pocket.”

The Pocket TV can be used for a number of multimedia capabilities including:
• Streaming Video: Watch YouTube, Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Videos on your TV in HD with up to 1080p resolution rather than on a small computer screen.
• Listen to music: The Pocket TV acts as a streaming device for music so you can play all of the content that’s on your computer or home network drive (NAS). That means you access not only your downloaded music but also your movies, TV shows and even your holiday pictures right on your home entertainment system.
• Gaming: You can now play thousands of games such as Angry Birds or racing and strategy games on a big screen instead of on your small screen smart phone or tablet.
• Social Media: Check your Facebook, Twitter and other social media apps on your big screen.
• News: Get CNN, BBC, Google Currents, Pulse, Flipboard and other similar news apps and access to on-demand news stories on your TV.
• Work: Edit documents, read PDFs, review PowerPoint, do video conferences and send and receive emails from a 50-inch monitor.
• Google Maps: Tired of squinting at your screen trying to find road directions? Yes we know you won’t be able to take your TV with you on the road, but the satellite imaging is insane on a 50-inch plasma!
• Web Browsing: Enjoy browsing the web with the Dolphin browser, Opera, or even Chrome and sync it with your laptop’s browser.
• Thousands more apps: The Google Play store is full of apps for all types of users and most of them work on the Pocket TV.

The Pocket TV features two remote control options, a standard IR Remote or an Air Remote. The standard IR Remote will ship with every Pocket TV. It uses an infrared signal just like your TV and gives you the ability to control the Pocket TV using the up, down, side arrows and several buttons. The Air Remote is a smart remote which has a gyroscopic sensor that allows you to control your Pocket TV just by moving it around (like a Wii controller). The motion of your hands will automatically be converted to signals and the cursor on your TV will follow your movements, up, down or sideways. It makes the Pocket TV a lot more intuitive and easy to use and adds a whole new dimension to the user experience.

In addition to the above remote options, you can control the Pocket TV from your smartphone or by programming your universal remote control. Last, the Pocket TV features a USB port so you can attach an external hard drive, a wireless keyboard and mouse or a video camera for video calls. It also has a Micro SD Card slot for extra storage.

Recently surpassing over $100,000 in pledges, the Pocket TV can be pre-ordered for a limited pre-order price of $99 (regular price $160) at: www.kickstarter.com/projects/484889112/the-pocket-tv-makes-any-tv-a-smart-tv   .

 About Infinitec:

Infinitec is a young 3-year-old start up. We’re a small team of friends with a mad set of skills ranging from engineering and programming to design and innovation. We started working together some years ago on several new concepts with the aim of creating innovative solutions that would make life easier for everyone who used them. We believe in innovation and breakthrough, and that every problem must have a solution. For more information about Infinitec visit www.infintec.com  .

 

Article source: http://www.paramuspost.com/article.php/20120609093234134

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08 Jun 12 HDMI Dongle Converts Any TV into Android Smart TV


This USB stick-sized micro-computer will turn an HDMI-capable TV into an Android 4.0-based TV that can download apps, play movies off a microSD card and more.

Startup company Infinitec has introduced the Pocket TV, an Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) based HDMI dongle that converts any HDTV into a Smart TV. It’s essentially a thumb-sized micro-computer packed with a 1 GHz Cortex A9 SoC, a Mali-400MP GPU, 512 MB of RAM, a USB 2.0 port, 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi and a microSD card slot (for up to 32 GB of storage) that’s capable of transforming a TV into a mega-sized tablet — only without the touchscreen capabilities, of course.

“You can download apps from the Google Play Store to stream videos, play games, connect with your friends on Facebook, catch up on news, do some work or simply surf the web,” the company said on Thursday. “You can even attach a video camera to do Skype video-calls on your TV. “

One of Infinitec’s big selling points with its new gadget is portability. Not only can end-users stream video, listen to music, get the latest news or check the latest Facebook feeds at home on their big screen TV, but they can take all of that content on the go by simply stuffing the dongle into their pocket, and then plug it into the HDMI port of a hotel TV. Executives won’t even need to take their laptop, as they could plug the Pocket TV into the projector and stream a presentation from the cloud (like a Dropbox account) or locally from the SD Card.

To control Pocket TV, Infinitec has thrown a standard IR Remote into the package. It uses an infrared signal and gives consumers the ability to control the Pocket TV interface using the up, down, side arrows and several buttons. There’s also an optional Air Remote which features a gyroscope sensor that allows the user to control Pocket TV simply by moving it around like a Wii controller. Move a hand up, down or sideways, and the cursor on the screen will follow.

“If you want you can also use your iPhone or Android smartphone to control the Pocket TV,” the company said. “Just download the Google Remote TV app from the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store and your phone will become your remote. We’re also working on our own app for your phone with some very cool features.”

The USB 2.0 port allows consumers to add an external hard drive, a wireless keyboard and mouse or a video camera for video calls. Pocket TV can even be connected to any standard TV as long as it has an HDMI port (or an attached HDMI converter box), and is capable of displaying up to 1080p. The only drawback to this gadget is that it needs to be plugged into a power outlet via a miniUSB port, and that the IR camera for the remote needs to be draped across the top of the TV.

Recently surpassing over $100,000 in pledges, the Pocket TV can be pre-ordered for a limited pre-order price of $99 (regular price $160) right here. As seen in the video below, the company actually used a 4-port USB hub so that they could use multiple USB devices. How users will be able to play Angry Birds with the IR Remote is unknown, if possible at all.

Article source: http://www.tomsguide.com/us/Infinitec-Dongle-Pocket-TV-Android-Kickstarter,news-15480.html

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