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25 Dec 12 First five Nexus 7 apps to download – Pocket


So you’ve ripped open the wrapping paper and flipped the lid on your brand new Nexus 7. You turn it on, only to stare at the vast emptiness that is the Android home screen.

Soon this void will be filled with all the wonderous apps that Google Play has to offer, but which to download first. Read on to find out the first five apps you’ll want on your Nexus 7.

Flipboard

An exciting twist on the traditional methods of interacting with social media is Flipboard. One sign-in from each and then social networks like Facebook and Twitter will be turned into an entirely personalised digital magazine.

The real joy of Flipboard is in its design, which looks especially plush on the Nexus 7′s 720p screen. Each network and status update is laid out differently, with images and video being cleverly interwoven into Flipboard’s UI. Flipboard review / Download it here

Sky Go

Only recently did Sky Go get Nexus 7 compatibility and it still doesn’t function on many other Android devices, so count yourself lucky if you are a Nexus 7 owner. The app allows you to watch your Sky subscription as well as on-demand content on your Nexus 7.

It costs around £15 a month for non-Sky TV customers and free for customers. The portability of the Nexus 7, coupled with access to your Sky account, can make for a very handy second-screen experience. Sky Go review / Download it here

Horn

Inside the Nexus 7 is a powerful quad core Tegra 3 processor. This means the tablet can run the very best of mobile games. Horn is one of them. Boasting stunning graphics and an in-depth console-rivalling style of gameplay. It is the gaming app to enjoy on your new tablet.

Horn is $6.99 (£5.07), making it one of the more expensive apps on Google Play, but when you realise the scale of the title, it should become clear you have got your money’s worth. Horn review / Download it here

TuneIn Radio

This app might be slightly long in the tooth, but it certainly isn’t showing its age. TuneIn Radio is one of the best ways to listen to music on your Nexus 7 for free.

The app is like a DAB radio but in app form. It accesses a large database of digital radio stations, including those of the BBC and then lets you stream them to your device. A clever browser lets you do things like search by genre and a Pro version allows you to record whatever you want to your Nexus 7. Download it here

Amazon Kindle

The Nexus 7 is an ideal eReader. As with just about any mobile platform or device, there is a Kindle app capable of running on it.

The Kindle app on Nexus 7 grants you access to more than 1 million titles, making for more than enough reading material to satisfy even the busiest of reader. The app is also capable of reading other things like PDFs, making it handy for work. Kindle review / Download it here

Article source: http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/48812/first-five-nexus-7-apps

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17 Dec 12 This Week In Android: Dec 10th-16th | Android.AppStorm


Android has had yet another big week with a bevy of app updates making their way onto the platform, some new device announcements thrown into the mix and interesting developments with Android’s main competitors. In our This Week in Android roundup for the past 7 days, we’ll take a quick look at all of this.
Like the article? You should subscribe and follow us on twitter.

App Updates: Yahoo!, Twitter, Instagram

A number of big apps received updates this week, notably Instagram and Twitter where the latter takes its own spin on filtered photos.

The Instagram update brings a brand new filter, the grayscale “Willow”, in addition to a number of performance enhancements and bug fixes. The iOS app did also recently receive a UI redesign but the Android update did not bring a similar changelog, although Android users can perhaps expect that refresh in the coming weeks.

The new Twitter app sporting photo filters.

In a similar update, Twitter introduced photo manipulation tools in-app, including filters for user images. The app can also do some basic editing such as cropping and auto-enhancing, but the main focus is the new filters that take photo uploading into direct competition with the aforementioned Instagram. This, obviously is a sign of heating rivalry between Twitter and Facebook, the owners of Instagram.

If you’re still one to use Yahoo! Mail, it also received an update to its Android app, refreshing its UI with a more Holo-styled design. Other major app updates from this week include the introduction of a new, adaptable design for scaling to tablets from The New York Times.

Google Updates: In-App Billing and Russian Launch

Google has been busy this week too, launching a revision of its in-app billing system. Version 3 brings an improved and simpler design, making it easier for developers to integrate into their apps, increases the system’s speed, performance and overall reliability. This is perhaps not the biggest of stories for the end-user but an important one for developers and Android’s standing as a premium app platform at large.

The Google Play store launches in Russia for movies and books.

In Russia, Google launched Google Play for books and movies. Google Play will offer over 1,000 Russian-language books and a library of international and local movie content. This comes just days after Apple announced a continued rollout of iTunes around the globe, including Russia.

Devices, Devices, Devices

As we approach the holiday season, device launches are expected to be less common — especially with CES just around the corner in January. However, there are still some hardware news of note.

Software updates to the GT-7100 and LTE GT-7105 models of the Samsung Galaxy Note II are being released with Android 4.1.2. This update brings a few notable features such as notification customisation, performance improvements to the browser and a new “Group Cast” application.

LG has had news to celebrate as we approach the end of the year too, announcing 10 million shipped units of the Optimus L series. The announcement hardly contains blockbuster numbers but is still an impressive amount for a mid-range series of handsets.

Conclusion

As we approach this holiday season, we’re rounding up a year of significant advancement for Android. Hardware news are becoming more sparse as we look forward to January and the CES announcements that it shall bring. However, software updates are still rolling strong as developers try to end the year on a high note and present their apps in tip-top condition for all the new users who’ll find Android devices under their Christmas tree.

Check back next week for another instalment of This Week in Android.

Article source: http://android.appstorm.net/general/app-news/this-week-in-android-dec-10th-16th/

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14 Dec 12 New Facebook update live on Google Play – Here …


That totally wonderific Facebook update that was supposed to go live later today? It’s live and yes, it’s totally awesome. Just like the Facebook guys promised, going full-blown native Android has made a world of difference, bringing forth an app that’s lighting quick and responsive. Say good bye to painful load screens, and images taking a lifetime to load. Posts from your “friends” are pushed to your device and your news feed is updated as they’re received. The result is 99% less pull-to-refreshes (we’ve calculated it). Neato.

There’s a few subtle UI changes as well. The action bar now auto hides as you scroll down your feed, resulting in a teensie bit more screen real estate than with the old app. Also, commenting on photos or posts results in a nicely animated quick popup letting quickly and easily leave awkward comments to that girl showing too much cleavage. Quick, quick, quick.

Comments: old vs new | Action bar: old vs new

Everything else is largely the same. It’s true there’s still a lot more work to be done, but I think it might be time to finally update all our 1-star ratings in the Play Store. Maybe to a… 3? Ah, what the hell. I’m giving it a 4. I am excite. If it’s been awhile since you downloaded the app, quick link has been provided below. Let me know what y’all think.

[Facebook on Google Play]

Article source: http://phandroid.com/2012/12/13/new-facebook-update-live-on-google-play-heres-an-old-vs-new-comparison-video/

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18 Jun 12 Early Metro-Style Chrome Comes to Windows 8


As promised, Google this week released a new version of Chrome for its dev channel that adds support for Windows 8 Metro mode.

The Monday release includes “improved support for on-screen keyboard on Windows 8 in Metro mode,” Google said in the release notes. It also “resolved several Windows 8 crashes and performance regressions.”

To try it, you’ll have to install the Release Preview of Windows 8 and then select Chrome as your default browser.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March, and announced last week that it was coming to the dev channel shortly.

The “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google said last week. But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs.”

Given that the Chrome dev channel and the Windows 8 Release Preview are pre-release versions of the software, these releases are intended for the tech-savvy rather than the average consumer.

On that front, Google today also announced new developer features for the Chrome Web Store, including the addition of six new countries: Turkey, Ukraine, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates. The search giant also created a new section for apps that work offline, and promised better information in the developer dashboard.

For more, check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below, as well as our review of Chrome 19.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405731,00.asp

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13 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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13 Jun 12 Early Metro-Style Chrome Comes to Windows 8


As promised, Google this week released a new version of Chrome for its dev channel that adds support for Windows 8 Metro mode.

The Monday release includes “improved support for on-screen keyboard on Windows 8 in Metro mode,” Google said in the release notes. It also “resolved several Windows 8 crashes and performance regressions.”

To try it, you’ll have to install the Release Preview of Windows 8 and then select Chrome as your default browser.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March, and announced last week that it was coming to the dev channel shortly.

The “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google said last week. But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs.”

Given that the Chrome dev channel and the Windows 8 Release Preview are pre-release versions of the software, these releases are intended for the tech-savvy rather than the average consumer.

On that front, Google today also announced new developer features for the Chrome Web Store, including the addition of six new countries: Turkey, Ukraine, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates. The search giant also created a new section for apps that work offline, and promised better information in the developer dashboard.

For more, check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below, as well as our review of Chrome 19.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405731,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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12 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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12 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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12 Jun 12 Chrome vs. Safari browsers on the MacBook Pro’s Retina display


Apple’s new MacBook Pro with its Retina display is undoubtedly a breakthrough for laptops, and certain notable third-party apps have already been updated to take full advantage of the expanded resolution. However, unlike the comparatively seamless leap to Retina displays made by the new iPad and the iPhone 4, it looks like OS X apps will need specific upgrades to see any advantage from the MacBook Pro’s screen.

You might find yourself switching to Safari for a while

While iOS automatically renders text and many other standard UI elements at Retina resolution, many apps currently look distinctly blurry on the new MacBook Pro’s display — we’ve been a little disappointed with how Google’s Chrome browser, the Steam client, and the Kindle app all look on our review unit, to name three. Of course, it probably goes without saying that this is likely a short-term problem, but it’s nevertheless something to bear in mind before you get in line at the Apple Store this morning. If you’re a Chrome user, you might find yourself switching to Safari for a while until Google issues an update, or at least playing around with the scaling settings with possible performance compromises.

To get a better idea of the difference in resolution ahead of our full review of the new MacBook Pro, check out this high-res screenshot of Chrome next to Safari.

Screen_shot_2012-06-11_at_11

Article source: http://www.theverge.com/2012/6/12/3079887/retina-display-new-macbook-pro-apps

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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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