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06 Jun 12 Galaxy Nexus drops to a cent on Amazon


Samsung Galaxy Nexus(Credit:
Sarah Tew/CNET)

Right now you can get a screaming deal on one of the top
Android phones around, as long as you’re willing to hand over two years of mobile indentured servitude to Verizon.

Google tapped Samsung to make its latest Nexus phone, which went on sale at the end of last year and was the first device to officially come preloaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Half a year later it’s still one of the top phones running the OS, and just a few months ago it was still selling for $299.99 with a new contract, so Amazon Wireless‘ new single-penny price point is a price slash that’s splattering savings all over the place.

The Galaxy Nexus comes with 4G connectivity, 32GB, an impressive 5-megapixel camera, and a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED display. The timing of the price drop likely is no coincidence. With Samsung’s much-anticipated Galaxy S III soon to drop in the United States, it makes sense to move more units of the
Galaxy Nexus before the S III sucks all the air out of the room.

You’ll need a new Verizon account to get the phone for a penny, unless you’re adding a line to a family account, which also gets you the big markdown. If you’re looking to upgrade your phone and extend your contract at the same time, you can still wind up with some savings by paying just $149.99 for a new Galaxy Nexus.

Then again, if you’re already spending more than $100, you might just want to wait for that Galaxy S III.

(Via TechCrunch)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57447779-1/galaxy-nexus-drops-to-a-cent-on-amazon/

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06 Jun 12 Galaxy Nexus drops to a cent on Amazon


Samsung Galaxy Nexus(Credit:
Sarah Tew/CNET)

Right now you can get a screaming deal on one of the top
Android phones around, as long as you’re willing to hand over two years of mobile indentured servitude to Verizon.

Google tapped Samsung to make its latest Nexus phone, which went on sale at the end of last year and was the first device to officially come preloaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Half a year later it’s still one of the top phones running the OS, and just a few months ago it was still selling for $299.99 with a new contract, so Amazon Wireless‘ new single-penny price point is a price slash that’s splattering savings all over the place.

The Galaxy Nexus comes with 4G connectivity, 32GB, an impressive 5-megapixel camera, and a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED display. The timing of the price drop likely is no coincidence. With Samsung’s much-anticipated Galaxy S III soon to drop in the United States, it makes sense to move more units of the
Galaxy Nexus before the S III sucks all the air out of the room.

You’ll need a new Verizon account to get the phone for a penny, unless you’re adding a line to a family account, which also gets you the big markdown. If you’re looking to upgrade your phone and extend your contract at the same time, you can still wind up with some savings by paying just $149.99 for a new Galaxy Nexus.

Then again, if you’re already spending more than $100, you might just want to wait for that Galaxy S III.

(Via TechCrunch)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57447779-1/galaxy-nexus-drops-to-a-cent-on-amazon/

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05 Jun 12 Is Android Having a Bad Year?


Denis Doyle/Bloomberg News

For some time now, Google‘s Android system has been No. 1 worldwide and in the United States in terms of smartphone market share. But recent statistics suggest that the almighty robot has been losing steam in this country.

Horace Dediu, an analyst who was previously a business development manager at Nokia, published a blog post on Monday with charts illustrating a slowdown of Android’s growth in the United States, citing numbers from ComScore, the market research firm.

He notes that smartphone purchases have slowed in recent months compared with November, and much of that can be traced to a tapering off in Android adoption. Apple‘s iPhone growth, meanwhile, has remained relatively healthy.

“The concern has to be that rather than seeing the net adds growing – as they have for two years with only two contiguous months of decline – Android net adds have been falling for four months,” he wrote.” In other words, while Android is still growing, its growth is much smaller than before — and it’s questionable whether it will continue to be the operating system of choice for smartphone buyers in the United States.

Some of the slowdown for Android is also attributable to the business market. A sampling of about 3,000 businesses using by Good Technology, a major information technology firm that provides mobile management software, found that iPhone usage was increasing in the workplace, while Android phones have seen a significant dip since last year.

Jan Dawson, a mobile analyst with Ovum, said that the apparent drop in Android device purchases was related to the iPhone becoming available on other carriers last year — before, it was exclusive to ATT — so it’s natural to see a drop in the near term. However, he said that in the long term, Android is likely to win in numbers because some Android phones are more affordable than the iPhone, and thus they appeal to a broader customer base over all.

“I think you have that one-time, U.S.-specific effect, plus a broader effect that affects people worldwide,” he said. “But long term I still expect Android to dominate, simply because it appeals to a much wider base of customers worldwide, especially at the low end.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/05/is-android-having-a-bad-year/

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04 Jun 12 Samsung Plans Carrier Blitz for New Galaxy Phone


The Galaxy S III is the latest Android smartphone from Samsung.Dita Alangkara/Associated PressThe Galaxy S III is the latest Android smartphone from Samsung.

Samsung on Monday said it would release its newest Android smartphone, the Galaxy S III, this month on each of the big wireless networks in the United States: Verizon, ATT, Sprint and T-Mobile USA. That’s a significant product introduction compared with other Android phones, which are typically released on one or two carriers.

This is how Samsung is competing with Apple: It’s investing a lot in a single phone and ensuring it has maximum distribution by teaming with all the big carriers. By way of comparison, Apple’s iPhone has over time become available on each of the big carriers, with the exception of T-Mobile (an absence that has hurt T-Mobile more than Apple).

Apple is now the world’s No. 1 smartphone maker, but Samsung is the world’s biggest mobile phone maker, factoring in traditional cellphones and smartphones. In terms of sales, the Galaxy S III and the iPhone will be the most directly comparable handsets in the United States, serving as a measure for what’s more appealing: Apple’s locked-down, polished iOS ecosystem, or Google’s more open, edgy Android system.

Samsung first released the new Galaxy phone in Europe last month. In the United States, its price will start at $200 with a two-year contract.

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/04/samsung-galaxy-s-iii-carriers/

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03 Jun 12 Samsung Galaxy S III: Possibly the Most Anticipated Android Phone Yet


A new Samsung Galaxy S Android smartphone

Samsung’s highly anticipated flagship Android smartphone, the Galaxy S III, debuts in 28 European countries this week. As such, reviews began pouring in across the Internet from those lucky enough to get their hands on the top Android smartphone. Meanwhile, technophiles and Fandroids in the United States only hope the saying “Good things come to those who wait” applies.

To refresh your memory, the Samsung Galaxy S III runs a 1.4 GHz quad-core processor, 8-megapixel camera, 2100 mAh battery, and a Near-Field Communications (NFC) chip for mobile payments. Running Android 4.0.4 “Ice Cream Sandwich,” the Galaxy S III has a 4.8-inch Super AMOLED display and records 1080p video.

Market Reaction and Thoughts

Reviewers note the Galaxy S III is balanced, at least more so than the awkwardly large 5.3-inch Galaxy Note. While the 4.8-inch screen isn’t petite, the overall consensus is it doesn’t feel small, but isn’t outlandishly hefty.

Overall, reviewers claim the S III is an improvement over other Superphones, but rather cumbersome to hold in one hand. The screen is definitively “supersized” if you’re coming from an iPhone, which maintains the “tiny” 3.5-inch Retina display.

Interestingly, Vlad Savov of The Verge notes the Galaxy S III has one of the best cameras he has ever used on an Android device. Interesting, because iFixIt recently revealed the Galaxy S III uses the same rear-camera sensor as the iPhone 4S.

In terms of the user interface, for better or worse, Samsung adds their TouchWiz UI on top of Android. Sharif Sakr of Engadget notes the competitive HTC One X has “a much better user interface that sticks more closely to the guiding ethos of Android 4.0.”

Sakr wasn’t the only one to criticize Samsung’s TouchWiz UI. Chris Hall of Pocket-Lint notes certain facets of the interface feel “cartoony.” That is, if you can see the display. Hall noted the screen could have been brighter, which was due to Samsung’s battery-saving feature. Overall, though, Hall praises the smartphone for its incredible power and expandability via the removable battery and microSD card slot.

Unfortunately, reviewers overwhelmingly dislike the plastic shell on the Samsung Galaxy S III. Unlike the HTC One X, which has a metallic finish, the S III doesn’t posses the same design standards. Critics went as far as to jokingly claim, Samsung’s lawyers designed the phone.

U.S. Differences and Availability

There are several key differences in the final U.S. Galaxy S III, which is expected to release later this summer. Mainly, the phone will run a dual-core processor with an integrated LTE chip. Luckily, most analysts say a quad-core chip in a cell phone is borderline overkill, so most users won’t notice the difference. Especially given Android isn’t engineered to leverage multiple cores.

The Galaxy S III is expected to cost $199 with a new two-year contract, but carrier information or pricing hasn’t been released. Like it’s predecessor, the Galaxy S II, it will be released on the major carriers, including Verizon and ATT.

Article source: http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/12302066-samsung-galaxy-s-iii-possibly-the-most-anticipated-android-phone-yet

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01 Jun 12 Judge Frees Google’s Android From Oracle Copyrights


The final ruling has come down in the epic legal battle between Oracle and Google. Image: s_falkow/Flickr

The federal judge refereeing the billion-dollar fight between Oracle and Google over the Android operating system has dismissed Oracle’s claim that the Java APIs used by Android are subject to copyright.

The APIs are application program interfaces, code that lets one piece of software talk to another. The general assumption has long been that APIs aren’t subject to copyright. But in suing Google over Android, Oracle insisted that they were, and after a six-week trial, the company’s efforts to win serious damages from Google came down to this single point.

But on Thursday, Judge William Alsup ruled that Oracle does not have the exclusive rights to the structure, sequence, and organization the 37 Java APIS in question.

“To accept Oracle’s claim would be to allow anyone to copyright one version of code to carry out a system of commands and thereby bar all others from writing their own different versions to carry out all or part of the same commands,” read the ruling from Alsup. “No holding has ever endorsed such a sweeping proposition.”

Oracle said it would “vigorously pursue an appeal” of the decision. But the ruling is good news for many companies and developers across the tech industry that build software platforms that clone existing APIs. Most notably, this includes cloud services that mimic the APIs of Amazon’s wildly successful EC2 service.

“The court’s decision upholds the principle that open and interoperable computer languages form an essential basis for software development,” read a canned statement from Google. “It’s a good day for collaboration and innovation.”

Oracle soon issued a response. “Oracle is committed to the protection of Java as both a valuable development platform and a valuable intellectual property asset,” the statement read. “This ruling, if permitted to stand, would undermine the protection for innovation and invention in the United States and make it far more difficult to defend intellectual property rights against companies anywhere in the world that simply takes them as their own.”

With his ruling, Alsup said that in cloning the 37 Java APIs, Google wrote 97 percent of the code from scratch and that the remaining three percent was lifted in accordance with the law. He also said that out of the 166 Java software packages controlled by Oracle, 129 were in no way infringed upon by Google. Oracle cannot legally claim, he argued, that it owns all possible implementations and pieces of the command structures of all 166 APIs.

Alsup added, however, that his order does not mean that the Java API packages are free for all to use without license or that the structure, sequence, and organization of all computer programs may be “stolen.” Google, he said, had simply acted appropriately under the U.S. Copyright Act.

In August of 2010, shortly after acquiring Sun Microsystems, the maker of Java, Oracle sued Google, claiming both copyright and patent infringement. But the meat of the case involved copyrights, as Oracle boss Larry Ellison pointed out during a public appearance on Wednesday, before Alsup’s ruling came down.

During the trial, Judge Alsup — who said he had learned to code in Java for the case — told the jury that when considering the arguments from Oracle and Google, it should assume that APIs are subject to copyright. Presumably, he wanted to avoid making a ruling on APIs and copyright if the jury had found that Google had not infringed. But in the end, the jury reached a partial decision that did not completely absolve Google and the Judge was forced to make a ruling.

The jury found that Google had infringed on Oracle’s copyrights cloning the APIs, but it couldn’t decide whether this infringement constituted fair use under the law.

On Wednesday, Ellison said he considered this a victory. And that was stretch even then. Now, claims of a win are even further fetched. Originally, Oracle sought to wring $7 billion in damages from Google, but after the ruling, it is entitled to next to nothing. Oracle only hope for significant damages is an appeal.

Update: This article was updated with a comment from Oracle.

Article source: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/05/oracle-google-judge-dismiss/

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29 May 12 Chrome Becomes Most Popular Worldwide Browser


Chrome Becomes Most Popular Worldwide Browser

Workers in the finance jobs often use computers throughout their workday, doing research on markets, investments and other aspects critical to company operations. To find the proper data, many use the internet, and search for the latest news via their browser of choice. Google Chrome recently surpassed Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as the most used browser.

Internet monitor StatCounter keeps track of the amount of people who use a number of browsers and organize them by location. Over the weekend, worldwide numbers confirmed more people were using Chrome than Internet Explorer, though that was not the case in many technologically advanced countries, such as the United States.

According to StatCounter, though Internet Explorer use took a dip and Chrome spiked, the former was still the preferred method of internet access. Firefox, Safari and Opera rounded out the top five most used browsers worldwide.

CNN reported Internet Explorer often has an advantage because it comes preloaded on many Windows computers, though many are adopting the view that Chrome is faster and more current.

CEO of StatCounter Aodhan Cullen suggested that though Internet Explorer may be dominant in the workplace, people would personally choose Chrome. “At weekends, when people are free to choose what browser to use, many of them are selecting Chrome in preference to IE,” he said in a release.


Article source: http://www.proformative.com/news/1480297/chrome-becomes-most-popular-worldwide-browser

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29 May 12 Chrome Becomes Most Popular Worldwide Browser


Chrome Becomes Most Popular Worldwide Browser

Workers in the finance jobs often use computers throughout their workday, doing research on markets, investments and other aspects critical to company operations. To find the proper data, many use the internet, and search for the latest news via their browser of choice. Google Chrome recently surpassed Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as the most used browser.

Internet monitor StatCounter keeps track of the amount of people who use a number of browsers and organize them by location. Over the weekend, worldwide numbers confirmed more people were using Chrome than Internet Explorer, though that was not the case in many technologically advanced countries, such as the United States.

According to StatCounter, though Internet Explorer use took a dip and Chrome spiked, the former was still the preferred method of internet access. Firefox, Safari and Opera rounded out the top five most used browsers worldwide.

CNN reported Internet Explorer often has an advantage because it comes preloaded on many Windows computers, though many are adopting the view that Chrome is faster and more current.

CEO of StatCounter Aodhan Cullen suggested that though Internet Explorer may be dominant in the workplace, people would personally choose Chrome. “At weekends, when people are free to choose what browser to use, many of them are selecting Chrome in preference to IE,” he said in a release.


Article source: http://www.proformative.com/news/1480297/chrome-becomes-most-popular-worldwide-browser

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25 May 12 Android Malware Surges, Botnet Business Booms


The volume of malware surged in the first three months of 2012. In particular, there’s been a flood of new types of rootkits, password-stealing Trojan applications, malware targeting Android users, and botnet infections.

This finding comes by way of a new report from security vendor McAfee.

“Malicious code is on the rise again, plain and simple,” said David Marcus, director of security research for McAfee Labs, in a related blog post. “We are seeing more malware than in the recent past, and you can count on that figure to rise in the coming year. In particular, mobile platforms present today’s cybercriminal with an almost irresistible target, specifically Android-based for now, but that can certainly evolve.”

[ Cyber-scams and malware are expected to escalate as we approach the 2012 Olympics. Read more at London 2012 Olympics Scammers Seek Malicious Gold . ]

The number of new malicious applications targeting mobile devices leapt from about 500 in the fourth quarter of 2011 to over 6,000 in the first quarter of 2012. The jump was targeted almost solely at the Android platform, according to the McAfee report. It also noted that the vast majority of Android malware targets mobile users based in Russia and China, and comes not via the official Google Play application store but via third-party sources.

From a corporate information security standpoint, the most prevalent types of network-based attacks seen between January and the end of March 2012 were remote procedure calls, SQL injection attacks, and browser cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks.

Geographically, the United States took top marks when it came to SQL injection attacks, both as the region from which most of these attacks were launched and as the biggest target. The United States also saw the largest number of machines compromised by botnets, which, as McAfee reported, are “often used as a proxy for spam, botnets, denial of service, or other types of malicious activities.”

On the good news front, spam volumes have recently been decreasing, with McAfee recording about 1 trillion spam messages circulating worldwide per month. Decreases were most significant in Brazil, Indonesia, and Russia, while increases in spam were found in China, Germany, Poland, Spain, and the United Kingdom, according to the report. The United Kingdom in particular is no surprise, given the increase in spam, phishing, and malware attacks that are related to the July 2012 Summer Olympics that will be happening in London.

If spam volumes are down, however, botnet activity is up. All told, McAfee saw about 5 million new botnet infections–2 million alone due to the Cutwail (a.k.a. Pushdo) botnet–during the first three months of 2012. The biggest increase in the overall number of botnet infections, meanwhile, was in Columbia, Japan, Poland, Spain, and the United States.

Without a doubt, the botnet business is booming–and for a price, anyone can buy in. For example, McAfee researchers found that a botnet known as Citadel, available via a malware-as-a-service model, costs $2,400, plus $125 for renting the required “bot builder and admin panel.” Meanwhile, for an additional $395, users can add an upgrade that brings “automatic updates for antivirus evasion,” according to the McAfee report, although each update then costs $15.

First detected in December 2011 and based on the published Zeus financial malware source code, Citadel has quickly become one of the most rapidly adopted profit-driven attack toolkits, meaning it’s designed to separate consumers from their bank account and credit card details.

Meanwhile, the price of the Darkness botnet marketed by “SVAS/Noncenz,” which is designed for launching distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against websites, starts at $450–with no free updates or add-on modules–but can rise to $1,000 for lifetime free upgrades and an attack module that will grab passwords from infected PCs.

Finally, the latest version of the Carberp financial botnet, which is designed to steal bank account data or even Facebook e-cash vouchers, costs $2,500. While Russian authorities announced on March 20, 2012, that they’d arrested the gang behind Carberp, the new version debuted the next day.

Think your corporate website isn’t vulnerable to a SQL injection attack? Start rethinking. SQL injection is among the most prevalent–and most dangerous–techniques for exploiting Web applications and attacking back-end databases that house critical business information at companies of every size. In our Stop SQL Injection report, we explain how SQL injection works and how to secure your Web apps and databases against it. (Free registration required.)

Article source: http://www.informationweek.com/news/security/attacks/240000992

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23 May 12 Google Chrome becomes most used Web browser


Google (GOOG) Chrome surpassed Internet Explorer last week as the world’s most used Web browser, according to a statistic released Monday.

The Google Web browser received more usage than Microsoft’s browser during the week of May 14 to May 20, marking the first time Chrome has received the highest traffic for a full seven days.

Chrome is now ahead of Internet Explorer, with Firefox in third place and Apple’s (AAPL) Safari a distant fourth, according to the website StatCounter.

Google would not address the statistic from StatCounter directly, but the company did put out a statement.

“It’s great to see more and more people around the world experiencing the speed, simplicity and security of Chrome,” a representative for the company said in an email. “We continue to remain focused on building a better browsing experience so that people can enjoy a better web.”

But while Chrome is finally No. 1 worldwide, there are still certain regions on the planet where Internet Explorer holds the title.

In the United States, Chrome was still in second place, and that held true to a dramatic degree in some countries like Japan and China, as

noted by The Verge.

However, the opposite held true in other countries and regions. In India, Chrome is the most used while Internet Explorer falls to third place, and in South America, Chrome brings in almost half of all Web traffic.

All in all, this is good news for Google because while browsers themselves do not make money, ad clicks from their search queries do. With more people using Chrome now, Google can rest assured its search engine is the default for most Web surfers.

Article source: http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_20685166/google-chrome-becomes-most-used-web-browser

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