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All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
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29 Dec 12 Control YouTube, Pandora, Grooveshark, & Netflix In Chrome With Flutter’s …


If you haven’t heard about Flutter, then you probably missed our review a few months back. Flutter is a small, uncomplicated program that allows a computer’s webcam to read your gestures and control some media players like iTunes, Windows Media Player, VLC, and QuickTime.

Three simple gestures help you to move from one spot on the playlist to another, and even pause the player. Flutter supports simple gestures, and while it doesn’t have the wizardry of a Kinect yet, it can be surprisingly effective for controlling your songs and movies from a distance.

With the launch of a new version, Flutter extends its support for Chrome, PowerPoint, and Keynote. The Flutter Chrome extension now allows you to use hand gestures on YouTube, Pandora, Grooveshark, and Netflix.  The Flutter blog says:

This new version is (in some sense) going back to our roots. The installation process is very simple: the new Flutter app automatically opens the Flutter extension URL at the end of the tutorial. Simply clicking “Add to Chrome” allows you to enjoy songs, movies and more using gesture control within your browser.

A few little touches add to the user friendliness of the app. You can toggle it on and off from the icon in the System Tray. You can set a ‘Preferred’ app by right-clicking the same icon and choosing among the applications that Flutter supports. The choice basically gives you control over a preferred app even as you work on another.

The new improved version of Flutter is a welcome announcement for the New Year.

Source: Flutter Blog

Article source: http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/control-youtube-pandora-grooveshark-netflix-in-chrome-with-flutters-hand-gestures-updates/

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27 Dec 12 Google Acts Against Malicious Chrome Extensions


Google Chrome Extension

Google’s latest steps will make it harder for malicious developers trying to exploit Chrome users via browser extensions.

Extensions are plugins for Google Chrome and allow developers to add extra functionality to the Web browser. Many Chrome extensions are supremely useful, such as Ghostery, which quickly and easily detects and blocks Web trackers tagging your movements across the Web, the goo.gl URL shortener, and ViewThru, which displays the full URL when mouse-overing a shortenend link. Others, like the “Change Your Facebook Color” extension pointed out by Webroot, are privacy-violating scams peeping at the browsing history and data from other Web sites. Spam-spewing extensions also exist.

While many of the extensions are accidentally installed by users who were tricked into downloading it, many were installed without the user’s knowledge by other dodgy applications using Chrome’s auto-install feature. To address that problem, Google has removed auto-installs in the latest version of Chrome.

No More Auto-Installs
Google originally included the auto-install feature to allow applications to install an additional Chrome extension during its own installation process. This was intended to simplify the installation process so that users didn’t have to add the extension manually afterwards. 

“Unfortunately, this feature has been widely abused by third parties to silently install extensions into Chrome without proper acknowledgement from users,” Peter Ludwig, a product manager at Google, wrote on the Chrmoium blog

Chrome (version 25 for those counting) will now block an application trying to auto-install an extension Google and display an alert informing the user about the new extension and list some of the things it can do (such as “Access your data on all Websites” and “Read and modify your bookmarks”).

Chrome 25 also automatically disables any extensions that were previously installed using the auto-install feature. If the user wants to re-enable the extension, the browser will display a one-time prompt explaining what each extension wants to do before allowing them to be turned back on. 

Stopping Malicious Extensions
Google also appears to have a new service which analyzes “every extension that is uploaded to the Web Store and take down those we recognize to be malicious,” according to the support pages for the Chrome Web Store. There isn’t a lot of information about the service at this time, so it’s not known whether Google is using an automated scanner similar to Google Bouncer checking app in Google Play (or if Bouncer itself is handling both markets).

Google has recently cracked down on extensions. Back in July, Google changed Chrome so that users could only install extensions found in the Chrome Web Store, and not from third-party sites. 

Article source: http://securitywatch.pcmag.com/none/306341-google-acts-against-malicious-chrome-extensions

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18 Dec 12 Google Chrome to Receive Search Refinements


Aims to deliver search results more swiftly.

Google has detailed changes coming to Chrome, with the company updating the developer’s version of the browser to deliver search results more quickly.

Originally released to a small number of users utilizing Chrome dev for Windows and the developer’s version of Chrome OS that have Google set as their default search provider, the changes have been applied to both the new tab page, as well as any searches typed into the location bar.

Google software engineer David Holloway said the changes are in response to those still navigating to their preferred search engine’s home page as opposed to searching from the location bar.

Situated on the new tab page, the default search engine provider is capable of embedding a search box and “otherwise customize” the page, though the latter wasn’t detailed by Google.

Elsewhere, in the omnibox (the URL field in the location bar), search engines can now depict search terms within the omnibox, excluding the requirement for a second search box displayed on the results page.

Search engine providers are now able to integrate the features through the new Embedded Search API, which is an extension of the SearchBox API. Holloway added that Chrome dev on Mac will receive the update in due course.

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

Article source: http://www.tomsguide.com/us/Google-Chrome-Search-Update-Browser,news-16459.html

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15 Dec 12 Chrome search refinements on their way


Changes are coming to the new tab page and omnibox to make searching faster.


(Credit:
Google)

Some slight search changes are coming to Chrome, as Google updates the developer’s version of the browser today to make getting to your search results more quickly.

Initially released to a small subset of people using Chrome dev for Windows (download) and the developer’s version of Chrome OS (read CNET review) that also have Google set as their default search provider, the changes affect both the new tab page and any searches you type into your location bar.

Google software engineer David Holloway wrote in his blog post announcing the search improvements that they’re a response to people still navigating to their preferred search engine’s home page instead of searching from the location bar.

On the new tab page, the default search engine provider will be able to embed a search box and “otherwise customize” the page. Google didn’t specify what those customizations could be.

In the omnibox, Google’s term for the URL field in the location bar, search engines can show search terms in the omnibox, precluding the need for a second search box on the results page. Since I haven’t gotten access to the feature and Google has not posted any screenshots, it’s not clear if you won’t be able to see your search results URL.

Search engine providers can add the features via the new Embedded Search API, an extension of the SearchBox API, wrote Holloway. He also said that Chrome dev on
Mac will get the update at some point in the future.

Article source: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-3514_7-57559328/chrome-search-refinements-on-their-way/

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11 Jun 12 Apple's new Safari takes a page from Chrome


The new version of Safari combines the search and location bar, and adds gesture support for tabs on Mac TrackPads.

(Credit:
James Martin/CNET)

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple unveiled a new version of
Safari today at the company’s World Wide Developer’s Conference here. The browser takes some visual cues from the competition but manages to maintain its unique take on browsing.

Not unlike Google’s Chrome, Safari 6 ditches its search bar in favor of a unified search-and-URL location bar. As with Chrome, and optional in
Firefox, the search-location bar clears up a significant chunk of the ever-dwindling browser screen real estate. You’ll have more room for extension icons, basically.

During the WWDC keynote this morning, Apple’s new head of
Mac software engineering, Craig Federighi, said Safari 6 has the fastest JavaScript engine of any OS, though he didn’t provide any comparison benchmarks.

The new Safari also synchronizes tabs from iCloud, so you can easily open tabs from other iCloud-enabled devices. Tab syncing has been available in Firefox, Chrome, and Opera — albeit through their own proprietary syncing systems.

Unlike those browsers, the new Safari will also let you “flip” through your tabs on the Mac TrackPad with new gestures. The Tab View feature lets you scroll through your open tabs in what appears to be a style similar to Cover Flow. When you use it on a Mac, though, the TrackPad gestures will let you use pinch-to-zoom to jump from an open tab to the Tab View, scroll around, and then jump into a different tab.

The new Tab View in Safari 6.

The new Tab View in Safari 6.

(Credit:
James Martin/CNET)

It’s not clear at this time whether the TrackPad tab gesture feature works only in Mountain Lion, or on previous versions of OS X as well. While this could be a very effective way to navigate a dozen or so tabs, it’s not apparent yet how well it will handle three or four dozen tabs.

Federighi described the new scrolling architecture to the WWDC audience as “awesome.”

Safari 6 for Macs will ship with Mountain Lion in July. Apple has not yet said when the update will be available for Windows, or which features will work in pre-Mountain Lion versions of OS X.

Apple’s WWDC 2012: iOS 6, Mountain Lion, and more (pictures)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-57450467-37/apples-new-safari-takes-a-page-from-chrome/?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-20

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06 Jun 12 Favorites lists also can be shared with Firefox, Chrome, other browsers


Some weeks ago, a reader asked how he could share his Favorites list between three computers, so that changes made to the list in the browser on one system would be conveyed to the other two automatically.In that column, I suggested he implement the “Windows Live Favorites” feature, an add-on to newer versions of Internet Explorer that has been designed for this very scenario.

To set this up, I suggested he visit this URL: http://bit.ly/J5FGaq

Since that column, several people have written in, asking for similar solutions to other browsers, such as Firefox and Chrome. Thankfully, as with IE, this also is easily accomplished.

In Firefox, you can share your Bookmarks (i.e. Favorites) between browsers, as well as browser tabs, add-ons and more, by enabling Firefox Sync. For more information, including instructions for setup, please visit this URL: http://bit.ly/M6Sj72

For Chrome, this can be accomplished by launching the Chrome browser on your computer of choice and then logging into your Google account. More information on how to set this up can be found at this URL: http://bit.ly/RShIB

As you can imagine, these are not the only browsers offering such capabilities. Richard Speroni of Palm City, for example, wrote in, touting similar offerings for the option-filled Opera browser.

“This browser has a feature called Opera Link that allows you to access your bookmarks, passwords and other items on any computer anywhere,” wrote Speroni. “You can even access these using a different browser.”

For more information on the Opera Browser, or to download it (it’s free), visit www.opera.com.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2012/jun/06/favorites-lists-also-can-be-shared-with-firefox/

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06 Jun 12 Favorites lists also can be shared with Firefox, Chrome, other browsers


Some weeks ago, a reader asked how he could share his Favorites list between three computers, so that changes made to the list in the browser on one system would be conveyed to the other two automatically.In that column, I suggested he implement the “Windows Live Favorites” feature, an add-on to newer versions of Internet Explorer that has been designed for this very scenario.

To set this up, I suggested he visit this URL: http://bit.ly/J5FGaq

Since that column, several people have written in, asking for similar solutions to other browsers, such as Firefox and Chrome. Thankfully, as with IE, this also is easily accomplished.

In Firefox, you can share your Bookmarks (i.e. Favorites) between browsers, as well as browser tabs, add-ons and more, by enabling Firefox Sync. For more information, including instructions for setup, please visit this URL: http://bit.ly/M6Sj72

For Chrome, this can be accomplished by launching the Chrome browser on your computer of choice and then logging into your Google account. More information on how to set this up can be found at this URL: http://bit.ly/RShIB

As you can imagine, these are not the only browsers offering such capabilities. Richard Speroni of Palm City, for example, wrote in, touting similar offerings for the option-filled Opera browser.

“This browser has a feature called Opera Link that allows you to access your bookmarks, passwords and other items on any computer anywhere,” wrote Speroni. “You can even access these using a different browser.”

For more information on the Opera Browser, or to download it (it’s free), visit www.opera.com.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2012/jun/06/favorites-lists-also-can-be-shared-with-firefox/

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24 May 12 Meet Yahoo’s new Web browser Axis



Axis replaces the standard search results page with a horizontal, scrollable list of thumbnails. iPad version shown.
(Credit: Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET)

Yahoo is announcing tonight that it’s getting into the browser business with its new Axis browser. There are versions for iPad and iPhone, and plug-ins for the desktop browsers Chrome, Firefox, IE, and Safari.

The design goal, according to Ethan Batraski, head of product for the Search Innovation Group at Yahoo, is to eliminate the middle step in the usual Web search process: Enter a query, see the results, go to a page. With Axis, you’re supposed to be able to go directly from query to page, skipping the step of surfing a sea of links.

The implication that Axis entirely bypasses the need to pick from search results is false, but Axis does nonetheless have a much better way of getting you from searching to visiting a Web page. The browser works well. This is an aggressive product for the struggling Yahoo to launch out of its search group.

Here’s why: Yahoo, which still generates more than a billion dollars a year in revenue from its search division, makes a lot of that money from that second step in the search process. It runs ads on search result pages.
On Axis, there are no search result pages.

Instead, what you get when you search, at least 80 percent of the time, Batraski says, is a horizontal display of Web page thumbnails. (The other 20 percent of the time you get text boxes with results in them.) It’s easy to see if one of the pages is what you’re looking for, and then you can go there directly. To see the tiles again and go to other results, you just pull down the page from the top. To move forward or backward in the list of results directly from a page you’re on, you drag your finger from the right or left. bypassing the results list entirely.

So, to be clear, there actually is a list of search results. It just looks a lot better because it’s integrated into the browser. Ads will get inserted into the list of search tiles eventually, assuming the product is a success with users. But for the time being, the more successful Axis is, the more it will drive Yahoo traffic away from search revenues–which only this last quarter began to recover after years of sliding.


The iPhone version’s interface is a little hemmed-in, but still very usable.

(Credit: Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET)

As a tactic for launching the browser, focusing on the user experience above all and forgoing search revenues is probably very wise, since it may be difficult for the browser to make a dent in the market. I asked Batraski about other alterna-browsers that struggled to win major market share, and mostly failed: Flock, Rockmelt, Opera, ATT’s Pogo, and others. Why does Yahoo think it can pull a Chrome with its product?

Distribution, says Batraski. There are 700 million people using Yahoo, and they can all be marketed to. Also, Yahoo distributes browsers (mostly IE with the Yahoo embedded toolbar) to 80 million people a year. The company knows how to get browsers out there, at least on desktop operating systems. But Axis on the desktop is actually not its own browser, but rather a plug-in that works with the browser a user already has. If you use the plug-in’s URL and search box in the lower-left of your browser, you’ll get Yahoo’s results. If you forget it’s there and use the browser’s standard URL/search box, you get whatever you’ve already been getting.

One gets the feeling that the desktop versions of Axis exist primarily as accessories to the mobile versions, so users can move between platforms and keep their open tabs and histories intact. When you’re logged in, Axis knows what you do on each device and makes it easy to pick up on one where you left off on another.

Mobile is where the action is, so it makes sense that Yahoo threw the bulk of its development love into the tablet and smartphone versions. On the iPad, Axis is simply a great browser. The integrated search feature is intuitive, and being able to move through search results without having to go back to search makes sense. After only a few minutes using it I thought, Why hasn’t Google done this yet? It’s that good.

Although mobile devices like the iPad come with embedded browsers, Batraski says the product has Apple’s blessing. He also said that Apple reps have told him they’re not throwing many resources into Apple’s own iOS browser, Safari. Axis takes the best that Safari has to offer–its core rendering engine, Webkit — and really does make it better. But no matter what Apple says, it’s not yet fully behind alternative browsers like Axis: On iOS, you can’t change your default browser (unless you jailbreak your device). Click a link in an e-mail message or another app, and your device will open it up in Safari, no matter how in love with Axis you are.

Batraski is convinced this will change eventually, and that if it doesn’t, Apple will have a Microsoft-scale antitrust issue on its hands.

What about Android? The Android version of Axis is still in development, and while it’s much easier for a user to get an alternative browser installed and embedded in an Android product, it’s a pretty safe bet that Google isn’t exactly going to roll out the welcome mat for Yahoo’s browser. Google already has two of its own browsers for mobile, the Android browser and the still-in-beta Android version of Chrome. And those drive traffic to Google’s ads, not Yahoo’s. (Firefox, by the way, defaults to using Google for search, so even when people use it instead of Chrome, Google still wins.)

The Axis browser may not conquer the world, but it is a very strong mobile product with an important new design concept for search. It’s also a gutsy business move from Yahoo. It’s rather refreshing.

Via CNET News

Article source: http://asia.cnet.com/meet-yahoos-new-web-browser-axis-62215665.htm

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22 May 12 Breaking Up with Google Chrome Is Hard to Do


I am still in love with Google Chrome. It’s smooth. The tabs open in just the right way. It knows exactly what I want. It feels right. And, not to mention it’s one of the best looking browsers I’ve ever been with. Even all my friends love Chrome — a rarity. But Chrome, you’ve wronged me too many times. I shouldn’t have to put up with any more flash crashes, something that has turned into more than a daily occurrence. You have eaten far too many blog posts. And, while your little “Aw, Snap!” and “Whoa! Google Chrome has crashed” error notes used to endear me, it has gotten old. Chrome: This is over.

RELATED: Internet Explorer Is Still the Browser We Love to Hate

The Rebound

Like any break-up, post-Chrome I sought an extreme rebound and migrated to Internet Explorer 9 after seeing its hip commercials. I still hated it. Especially compared to my beloved Chrome. For a heavy Internet user, like a blogger, Internet explorer didn’t handle tabs as well, putting them next to the address bar, instead of above it. It got all scrunchy, opening multiple windows got crowded, fast, and in general, it just felt very slow. (Other blogger tests confirmed that slowness.)

RELATED: Chart: What Your Web Browser Says About Your IQ

But, those commercials just kept playing during Mad Men and, as I was in the market for a new browser, they enticed me for a second round. Thanks to a little help from Microsoft spokesperson Jenn Foss, the transition wasn’t as painful as expected. As for the tab situation, Foss explained that Microsoft put the tabs there to give the web page as much room as possible. But for super-users, who keep more than 8 tabs going at a time, the browser gives the option of having the tabs show up below the address bar. “You can now choose to have tabs be their own row,” Foss explained. “Just right-click above the one-box and select, “show tabs on a separate row.” With that you can literally go edge to edge with your tabs,” she continues. 

RELATED: We Fell for the Internet-Explorer-Users-Are-Stupid Hoax

Default Tabs. (Cringe):

RELATED: Internet Explorer Also Has a Google-Tracking Problem

RELATED: Microsoft’s Zune Is Dead; Let’s Relive Its Finest Moment

Much better:

 

Like all rebounds, however, I soon realized that IE and I would never last. Just like the tests say, man is Internet Explorer slow. The whole experience feels like retro Internetting. Not only does it take a very long time for pages to load, but the fonts and icons with their boxy look, feel old, compared to Chrome’s smoother edges and bigger font size. This blogger does not like to wait around. And realizing I could do better, I moved on.

The Exes Revisited

After a few days with Microsoft’s offering, I went back to some old favorites, Firefox for my work PC, and Safari for Mac browsing at home. Like any rekindling of an old-fling, at first I questioned why I ever left these guys. Firefox has all those extensions, it’s almost as pretty as Chrome, and works pretty fast. Then, I remembered all the flaws. One reason I dumped Firefox was because of bloat issues, which LifeHacker’s Adam Pash explains as such. “It’s not at all uncommon to see a Firefox installation eating up more than any running application on your system, and while the memory consumption itself isn’t that big of a deal (Chrome eats a lot of memory, too), the high memory usage is often accompanied by serious browser slowdowns, which is a very big problem, and one that, anecdotally, at least, we hear from tons of Firefox users and very few Chrome users,” he writes. It also has this infuriating tab issue, where it makes me scroll to see beyond 10 tabs. Also, why is its CTRL + F function case sensitive?

Also, why have neither of these browsers adopted the omnibox? For a harried Internet surfer, combining the URL box is one less thing to think about. Plus, I had to hand program both Firefox and Safari to do a Google search from the address bar. A few days with the old lovers, and the old issues resurfaces, an irritating reminder of the reason I left them in the first place. Then, Firefox had a flash crash of its own and that was it. Moving on.

A New Kind of Love

I am now getting to know Opera. We’re not boyfriend-girlfriend. We’re just seeing each other. Some might call it dating. Those speed tests have it as a pretty good match-up with Chrome. Though, it does feel a little slower. But that may be because it keeps me posted of its progress as it loads a page.

It also has some other nice features. Like, it previews the page behind the tab. CNET’s five-star review reads like an online dating profile for the browser. Like all partners, Opera is sure to have weaknesses and annoying quirks. Nobody, browsers included, is perfect. But, there’s a difference between abusive and annoying.

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/breaking-google-chrome-hard-204108676.html

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15 May 12 Adding social context to sites with mon.ki Chrome extension


monki Adding social context to sites with mon.ki Chrome extension

Self described “social compass”

Just a month old, mon.ki is a new Google Chrome browser app that helps you discover valuable connections when on a website, adding social context to your web experience without having to leave the site to learn who in your social circles are relevant on a given topic. The company calls itself the “social compass,” noting that they automatically extract information about the page you are visiting and guide you to the right people, all within your browser.

So if you visit a website about turquoise jewelry, the extension will show you not only who is talking about that website, allowing you to retweet or respond from the sidebar without leaving the site, it also searches for any term you request, never requiring you to flip from tab to tab to find deeper context to any site or topic. “The value proposition is simple convenience – no jumping from page to page, no searching one by one for relevant profiles and keywords – just the people you need, at your fingertips,” the company says.

See what people in your Twitter network are saying that relates to any page you visit, see topics being tweeted about in your network, and tweet directly from the sidebar about the site you’re visiting, complete with a shortened URL.

Currently, mon.ki is in private beta and it appears that they allow users in in batches. The private beta currently supports Twitter and the company tells AGBeat that other browsers and social networks will be added to the available features. The company says they have had overwhelmingly positive reviews. “Our users tell us they love the ease of use, functionality and design of our social compass. The calm technology (that which informs but doesn’t demand our focus or attention) aspect is a big part of the positive user experience.”

android market download button Adding social context to sites with mon.ki Chrome extension

Below is a user review of the extension, but note that it is a little outdated, as the extension is now available in the Google Marketplace and does not require a manual installation. This is helpful to get an overview of the extension’s features:

Editor Picks

Article source: http://agbeat.com/real-estate-technology-new-media/adding-social-context-to-sites-with-mon-ki-chrome-extension/

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