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28 May 12 Facebook needs Opera – to rescue it from dependence on Apple


Analysis Facebook is reported to be interested in buying Scandinavian browser company Opera Software.

The facts are few, the sourcing criminally light, but the story arrives as Opera is also reported to have instituted a hiring freeze that some claim is a harbinger to putting itself up for sale.

Both firms refused to comment on the reports when contacted by The Reg.

Why would Facebook want to own its own browser, especially when Opera has minuscule market share and is better at generating publicity than desktop growth?

Facebook is also interested in buying Face.com and, again, preparing its own phone having poached six iPhone engineers and one from the iPad team at Apple.

A market once thought dead has been on fire in recent years, thanks initially to Mozilla’s Firefox: that led to Google’s Chrome and Microsoft’s conversion to standards with IE9 and IE10. Things are so promising, even Yahoo! is making a play for a stake in browsers, with its Axis.

Why have a browser? As far as Microsoft was concerned at least, it was felt if you lost the browser you lost the desktop and MSN business. Microsoft likes to create what it calls “optimized experiences” and on IE today that means things like pinning web pages to the bottom of the Windows 7 screen to help you find them fast.

This sort of thinking comes from the type of company with a market to protect; today’s browser makers don’t have this but are trying to make themselves more relevant and the perceived way of doing that is performance for the end user.

Google launched Chrome despite partnering with Mozilla on Firefox because Firefox was slowing down, turning into big ol’ memory hog – although that’s been rectified now. Google added incognito browsing, search with sites from the toolbar and tabbed synching. Opera has also sped up browsing, with Turbo that compresses web pages by up to 80 per cent to serve pages to most devices – and a claimed 90 per cent for Apple’s iPhone and iPad – across narrow or spotty networks. Microsoft responded by making IE fast and look more like Chrome.

After awhile all this speed and performance goes unnoticed by the typical web user on the desktop. But this is not the target demographic; the new targets are those using specific apps, like gaming, and those on phones and tablets, which have limited onboard compute and are at the mercy of spotty networks.

That’s why Firefox and Chrome have been focusing on hardware accelerated graphics rendering; to offload traffic from the CPU and prolong battery life.

Hence, we also now have Firefox and Chrome for Android.

One company that doesn’t let you run your browser on the device unless it’s native is the company that’s got the best and most exciting market share: Apple’s insistence on native software has kept Firefox and Chrome off its phones.

The Opera Mini web browser is the exception; it’s permitted because Opera Mini caches web pages using Opera’s global network of servers to render and execute pages rather than this happening on the device. In that respect, Opera Mini is more of a service app so passes Apple’s rules without Opera needing to build one version for Apple’s phones and tablets, and another for everybody else.

Opera Mini isn’t restricted to iOS, though, and Opera claims 168 million users running on Java ME, Android, Windows Mobile, iOS, BlackBerry and Symbian, too. Importantly, they are largely in emerging markets: Opera has struggled in the US and Europe but is strong in growing markets such as Russia, Brazil, Africa and South East Asia.

Opera has another plus: an ad-serving network, bought early last year for $8m plus. Mobile ads aren’t owned by any single company at present, unlike the desktop. Ads are vital part of the newly IPO’d Facebook, as chief operating officer Sheryl Sandburg reminded us all as the stock slid south last week.

Given this, it’s credible that Facebook wants the engineers, the servers and the ads network owned by Opera. The former could speed the performance of its site on all devices, especially the iPhone and iPad – something it otherwise has no control over.

This might also explain why Facebook has poached Apple phone and tablet engineers, rather than the social network entering a phone handset business that’s demanding, expensive to fund and has barely sustainable margins.

Learn from Adobe

This is happening elsewhere: Adobe has stealth hired some hard-core language and Java Virtual Machine (JVM) experts from Oracle to make its ActionScript VM run better outside the Flash Player that’s been pariahed by Steve Jobs, in an increasingly browser-plug-in free internet universe of tablets and phones.

In that case, Adobe lured just four people. Opera has 700. Facebook plainly has the money to burn, having spent $1bn on Instagram lately only to launch an Instagram-like mobile camera app via iTunes. It’s believed Facebook bought Instagram to head off potential competition – Instagram had 50 million users, adding five million per week.

And therein lies a reason for Facebook to buy Opera: competition. Safari, thanks to Apple’s success with the iPhone and iPad, dominates mobile. That confers huge power on Apple; some newspaper publishers have realized this power hanging over their heads and walked away from the AppStore and gone to HTML5 rather than surrender their independence to Apple. Facebook, with an IPO under its belt and managers now answerable to shareholders, must look for ways to end its complete and utter reliance on one company to reach millions of users.

Sounds crazy? Don’t underestimate independence: it was the reason Oracle first dedicated engineering resources to improve the Linux kernel and put its ERP on Linux, in the late 1990s making it the first big software vendor to do so. It did so to end its utter reliance on the roadmap and direction of Windows on servers.

The question is: what price does Facebook attach to independence? ®

Article source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/28/facebook_to_buy_opera/

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28 May 12 Facebook needs Opera – to rescue it from dependence on Apple


Analysis Facebook is reported to be interested in buying Scandinavian browser company Opera Software.

The facts are few, the sourcing criminally light, but the story arrives as Opera is also reported to have instituted a hiring freeze that some claim is a harbinger to putting itself up for sale.

Both firms refused to comment on the reports when contacted by The Reg.

Why would Facebook want to own its own browser, especially when Opera has minuscule market share and is better at generating publicity than desktop growth?

Facebook is also interested in buying Face.com and, again, preparing its own phone having poached six iPhone engineers and one from the iPad team at Apple.

A market once thought dead has been on fire in recent years, thanks initially to Mozilla’s Firefox: that led to Google’s Chrome and Microsoft’s conversion to standards with IE9 and IE10. Things are so promising, even Yahoo! is making a play for a stake in browsers, with its Axis.

Why have a browser? As far as Microsoft was concerned at least, it was felt if you lost the browser you lost the desktop and MSN business. Microsoft likes to create what it calls “optimized experiences” and on IE today that means things like pinning web pages to the bottom of the Windows 7 screen to help you find them fast.

This sort of thinking comes from the type of company with a market to protect; today’s browser makers don’t have this but are trying to make themselves more relevant and the perceived way of doing that is performance for the end user.

Google launched Chrome despite partnering with Mozilla on Firefox because Firefox was slowing down, turning into big ol’ memory hog – although that’s been rectified now. Google added incognito browsing, search with sites from the toolbar and tabbed synching. Opera has also sped up browsing, with Turbo that compresses web pages by up to 80 per cent to serve pages to most devices – and a claimed 90 per cent for Apple’s iPhone and iPad – across narrow or spotty networks. Microsoft responded by making IE fast and look more like Chrome.

After awhile all this speed and performance goes unnoticed by the typical web user on the desktop. But this is not the target demographic; the new targets are those using specific apps, like gaming, and those on phones and tablets, which have limited onboard compute and are at the mercy of spotty networks.

That’s why Firefox and Chrome have been focusing on hardware accelerated graphics rendering; to offload traffic from the CPU and prolong battery life.

Hence, we also now have Firefox and Chrome for Android.

One company that doesn’t let you run your browser on the device unless it’s native is the company that’s got the best and most exciting market share: Apple’s insistence on native software has kept Firefox and Chrome off its phones.

The Opera Mini web browser is the exception; it’s permitted because Opera Mini caches web pages using Opera’s global network of servers to render and execute pages rather than this happening on the device. In that respect, Opera Mini is more of a service app so passes Apple’s rules without Opera needing to build one version for Apple’s phones and tablets, and another for everybody else.

Opera Mini isn’t restricted to iOS, though, and Opera claims 168 million users running on Java ME, Android, Windows Mobile, iOS, BlackBerry and Symbian, too. Importantly, they are largely in emerging markets: Opera has struggled in the US and Europe but is strong in growing markets such as Russia, Brazil, Africa and South East Asia.

Opera has another plus: an ad-serving network, bought early last year for $8m plus. Mobile ads aren’t owned by any single company at present, unlike the desktop. Ads are vital part of the newly IPO’d Facebook, as chief operating officer Sheryl Sandburg reminded us all as the stock slid south last week.

Given this, it’s credible that Facebook wants the engineers, the servers and the ads network owned by Opera. The former could speed the performance of its site on all devices, especially the iPhone and iPad – something it otherwise has no control over.

This might also explain why Facebook has poached Apple phone and tablet engineers, rather than the social network entering a phone handset business that’s demanding, expensive to fund and has barely sustainable margins.

Learn from Adobe

This is happening elsewhere: Adobe has stealth hired some hard-core language and Java Virtual Machine (JVM) experts from Oracle to make its ActionScript VM run better outside the Flash Player that’s been pariahed by Steve Jobs, in an increasingly browser-plug-in free internet universe of tablets and phones.

In that case, Adobe lured just four people. Opera has 700. Facebook plainly has the money to burn, having spent $1bn on Instagram lately only to launch an Instagram-like mobile camera app via iTunes. It’s believed Facebook bought Instagram to head off potential competition – Instagram had 50 million users, adding five million per week.

And therein lies a reason for Facebook to buy Opera: competition. Safari, thanks to Apple’s success with the iPhone and iPad, dominates mobile. That confers huge power on Apple; some newspaper publishers have realized this power hanging over their heads and walked away from the AppStore and gone to HTML5 rather than surrender their independence to Apple. Facebook, with an IPO under its belt and managers now answerable to shareholders, must look for ways to end its complete and utter reliance on one company to reach millions of users.

Sounds crazy? Don’t underestimate independence: it was the reason Oracle first dedicated engineering resources to improve the Linux kernel and put its ERP on Linux, in the late 1990s making it the first big software vendor to do so. It did so to end its utter reliance on the roadmap and direction of Windows on servers.

The question is: what price does Facebook attach to independence? ®

Article source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/28/facebook_to_buy_opera/

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28 May 12 Apple Beats Android in Europe Not in US



While it is the ongoing competitive tussle between Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android that grabs the headlines, it is easy to forget just how far ahead these two operating systems have pulled ahead of the rest. The latest figures from the London headquartered Adfonic show 83% of ad impressions globally originate from iOS or Android-powered handsets.

Apple’s iOS is responsible for the largest proportion, 45%, of ad impressions on the global network. It is particularly strong in Europe where it accounts for 52% of impressions.

In the U.S. however, it is Android that leads with a 46% share, according to Adfonics inaugural Global Admetrics report. The regional variations extend to other platforms, reports Mobile Marketing.

Symbian is relatively popular in Africa (20 per cent) and Asia (8 per cent), but its proportion of ad impressions is negligible in other regions. In terms of clickthrough rates, mobile ads on devices using Android outperform those served to devices using iOS in entertainment, lifestyle and social networking mobile apps and sites. Despite its current problems, RIM nonetheless has two BlackBerry handsets among the top eight devices by volume of ad impressions, and while devices using Windows Mobile or Windows Phone 7 currently make up a small proportion of global ad impressions, it is interesting to note that these operating systems demonstrate very positive click-through rates.

It also seems there is one type of content that is most effective for mobile advertisers.

In line with wider industry trends, apps and mobile sites featuring games enjoy the biggest proportion of mobile ad impressions, accounting for 44 per cent in Europe and for more than 30 per cent across all other regions except Africa. Games content also sees the strongest clickthrough rates globally of any content category, and generates the highest earnings for publishers and developers.

A full copy of theAdfonic report is available for download.

Mobile Marketing: iOS and Android Account For 83 Per Cent of Adfonic’s Ad Impressions

Article source: http://blogs.wsj.com/tech-europe/2012/05/28/apple-beats-android-in-europe-not-in-u-s/?mod=google_news_blog

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27 May 12 Android, Apple top smartphone market – in that order


Two San Jose area companies are at the top of the smartphone industry. Mountain View-based Google and Cupertino-based Apple are number 1 and 2, respectively, in their shares of the smartphone market, based on operating system. The proof comes from a report from the research firm IDC on smartphone sales worldwide in the first quarter of 2012.

According to a May 24 report from IDC, 59 percent of the smartphones shipped in the first three months of this year were powered by Google’s Android operating system, up from just 36.1 percent in the first quarter of 2011. The market share boost was driven by a 145 percent increase in unit shipments to nearly 90 million this year. Apple, whose operating system is called iOS, followed with market share of 23 percent, from 18.3 percent in the year ago quarter, driven by an 88.7 percent jump in sales to 35.1 million units this first quarter.

As I’ve noted before, Android is growing faster than Apple because its OS is offered on a wide variety of smartphone brands, primarily, HTC, Motorola and Samsung, which has helped those brands thrive in sales tracked by IDC based on brand. The iOS operating system, on the other hand, only runs on iPhones.

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Everyone else’s smartphone OS shares are in single digits: Symbian OS, used on Nokia smartphones, a 6.8 percent share in the first quarter; BlackBerry OS from the beleaguered RIM, 6.4 percent; the open source Linux OS, 2.3 percent; and Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7 and Windows Mobile, 2.2 percent.

And in the dynamic smartphone industry, of course, things are changing fast. Nokia has discontinued the Symbian OS and decided to use the Windows Phone 7 OS going forward. Windows Mobile was the predecessor to WP7 and while it surprises me that phones with Windows Mobile on them are still being sold, I guess there are some pockets of the world where they are still available.

But obviously, the smartphone business is thriving; the IDC report says smartphone sales jumped by close to 50 percent in the first quarter to 152.3 million units, from 101.6 million in the year ago quarter.

With better processors, a wide variety of apps to download from each OS company’s app stores and faster carrier networks available, people can get more out of their smartphones, including faster loading Web pages, dedicated social media apps, taking and sharing of photos, improved video streaming quality and other features, smartphones have become a must-have gadget for more and more people.
 

Article source: http://www.examiner.com/article/android-apple-top-smartphone-market-that-order

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26 May 12 Smartphone competitors fail to keep up with iOS, Android: IDC



Smartphones running Apple’s iOS platform and Google’s Android operating system are outshining the rest of the smartphone market, says a new report from market researcher IDC.
Both Android and iOS have seen their share of the smartphone market grow progressively over the last twelve

months, with Android accounting for 59% of the smartphone market and iOS 23%. During the first quarter of 2011 Android and iOS accounted for a combined share of 54.4%.

“The popularity of Android and iOS stems from a combination of factors that the competition has struggled to keep up with,” says Ramon Llamas, senior research analyst with IDC’s Mobile Phone Technology and Trends program. “Neither Android nor iOS were the first to market with some of these features, but the way they made the smartphone experience intuitive and seamless has quickly earned a massive following.”

Previous market leader Symbian saw a sharp decline over the last year as Nokia transitioned to Microsoft’s Windows Phone platform. BlackBerry was also on a downwards spiral falling from 13.6% of the market in 2011 to 6.1% in 2012.

While Windows Phone 7/Windows Mobile currently accounts for just 2.2% of the market, the platform is expected to show moderately increased growth in the latter half of the year and beyond as both Nokia and Microsoft boost WP7 sales volumes. IDC notes that platform growth will be slow until “Nokia speeds the cadence of its smartphone releases or more vendors launch their own Windows Phone-powered smartphones.�

A separate report from analyst firm ABI Research suggests shipments of “phabletsâ€� — devices that are bigger than smartphones but smaller than tablets — such as the Android-powered Samsung Galaxy Note will exceed 208 million units globally by 2015.

“One of the chief drivers for phablets is the amount of time people use their smartphones for web browsing, reading articles and newspapers on the go, or simply navigating their journeys,â€� says senior ABI analyst Joshua Flood. “The larger screen sizes make a significant difference to the user’s experience when compared to conventional-sized touchscreens between 3.5 to 4 inches.â€� Additionally, new phablet-styled devices provide an attractive two-in-one device proposition and are beginning to see the competition between these larger smartphone form factors and smaller media tablets (less than seven inches).”

Article source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/technology/PersonalTech-Updates/Smartphone-competitors-fail-to-keep-up-with-iOS-Android-IDC/SP-Article1-861664.aspx

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15 May 12 Windows Phone smokes Android, iPhone, but no one wants it


During Microsoft’s recent Smoked by Windows Phone challenge, Microsoft-based devices were almost always faster at completing everyday tasks compared to Android and iPhone handsets. But even the fastest Windows Phone can’t run away from the fact that nobody’s buying Microsoft-powered handsets.

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Despite critical acclaim, cheap phones, and a novel take on the Pepsi Challenge, few people in the U.S. want a Windows Phones and its market share may be slipping faster than its predecessor, Windows Mobile.

Smoked, by the Numbers

Microsoft recently wrapped up the Smoked by Windows Phone promotion claiming Windows Phone devices beat out more than 50,000 challengers in 36 countries. During the challenge, your smartphone would participate in a head-to-head race against a Windows Phone to complete a basic task such as uploading a photo to Facebook, searching for movie times, or checking weather forecasts. If you won, you’d typically get $100, although Microsoft did offer a new laptop and $1,000 at one point. Microsoft only had to pay out 2 percent of the time, claiming a win rate of 98 percent. The software maker will now use its crushing victories to cover the Internet with video ads showing how awesome a Windows Phone can be.

The Fix is in

Smoked by Windows Phone was also accused of being an unfair challenge and Microsoft even tried to wrangle one crushing defeat against a Samsung Galaxy Nexus into a win, citing a technicality. Tech writer Sahas Katta took his Samsung Galaxy Nexus into a Santa Clara, Calif., Microsoft Store and was challenged to look up the weather in two different cities. Katta had two weather widgets on his Android home screen and had set up his phone to bypass the lock screen so all he had to do was turn on the phone and he’d win. That’s exactly what happened, but Microsoft employees quickly tried to wrangle out of giving Katta the prize with several excuses such as he had to show the weather in two different states. After the rest of the tech media picked up the story, Microsoft apologized and offered Katta the prize.

Soon after Katta’s experience, The Verge tried the challenge and claimed Microsoft stacked the deck in its favor by picking tasks that favored Windows Phone features such as social networking and search baked in to the OS.

No Escape

Despite Microsoft’s best efforts, its new smartphone platform is not popular with consumers. In fact, Windows Phone appears to be less popular in the U.S. than Microsoft’s aging Windows Mobile platform, according to Nielsen. The metrics firm issued a report Monday claiming that during the first three months of 2012, Windows Phone had a market share of just 1.7 percent, far behind fourth place Windows Mobile at 4.1 percent. The top smartphone operating systems in the U.S. are Android (48.5 percent), iOS (32 percent), and BlackBerry (11.6 percent).

Less than a week earlier, NPD Group said Windows Phone 7 had just 2 percent market share in the U.S. during the same period as Nielsen’s report. But more recent numbers from metrics firm comScore recently claimed Microsoft has about 4 percent of the U.S. smartphone market; however, comScore did not differentiate between Windows Mobile and Windows Phone devices.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/276094/windows-phone-smokes-android-iphone-no-one-wants-it

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10 May 12 Windows Phone Smokes Android, iPhone, But No One Wants It


Windows Phone Smokes Android, iPhone, But No One Wants ItDuring Microsoft’s recent Smoked by Windows Phone challenge, Microsoft-based devices were almost always faster at completing everyday tasks compared to Android and iPhone handsets. But even the fastest Windows Phone can’t run away from the fact that nobody’s buying Microsoft-powered handsets.

Despite critical acclaim, cheap phones, and a novel take on the Pepsi Challenge, few people in the U.S. want a Windows Phones and its market share may be slipping faster than its predecessor, Windows Mobile.

Smoked, by the Numbers

Windows Phone Smokes Android, iPhone, But No One Wants ItMicrosoft recently wrapped up the Smoked by Windows Phone promotion claiming Windows Phone devices beat out more than 50,000 challengers in 36 countries. During the challenge, your smartphone would participate in a head-to-head race against a Windows Phone to complete a basic task such as uploading a photo to Facebook, searching for movie times, or checking weather forecasts. If you won, you’d typically get $100, although Microsoft did offer a new laptop and $1,000 at one point. Microsoft only had to pay out 2 percent of the time, claiming a win rate of 98 percent. The software maker will now use its crushing victories to cover the Internet with video ads showing how awesome a Windows Phone can be.

The Fix is in

Smoked by Windows Phone was also accused of being an unfair challenge and Microsoft even tried to wrangle one crushing defeat against a Samsung Galaxy Nexus into a win, citing a technicality. Tech writer Sahas Katta took his Samsung Galaxy Nexus into a Santa Clara, Calif., Microsoft Store and was challenged to look up the weather in two different cities. Katta had two weather widgets on his Android home screen and had set up his phone to bypass the lock screen so all he had to do was turn on the phone and he’d win. That’s exactly what happened, but Microsoft employees quickly tried to wrangle out of giving Katta the prize with several excuses such as he had to show the weather in two different states. After the rest of the tech media picked up the story, Microsoft apologized and offered Katta the prize.

Soon after Katta’s experience, The Verge tried the challenge and claimed Microsoft stacked the deck in its favor by picking tasks that favored Windows Phone features such as social networking and search baked in to the OS.

No Escape

Despite Microsoft’s best efforts, its new smartphone platform is not popular with consumers. In fact, Windows Phone appears to be less popular in the U.S. than Microsoft’s aging Windows Mobile platform, according to Nielsen. The metrics firm issued a report Monday claiming that during the first three months of 2012, Windows Phone had a market share of just 1.7 percent, far behind fourth place Windows Mobile at 4.1 percent. The top smartphone operating systems in the U.S. are Android (48.5 percent), iOS (32 percent), and BlackBerry (11.6 percent).

Windows Phone Smokes Android, iPhone, But No One Wants ItLess than a week earlier, NPD Group said Windows Phone 7 had just 2 percent market share in the U.S. during the same period as Nielsen’s report. But more recent numbers from metrics firm comScore recently claimed Microsoft has about 4 percent of the U.S. smartphone market; however, comScore did not differentiate between Windows Mobile and Windows Phone devices.

Meanwhile, Microsoft’s biggest Windows Phone partner, Nokia, recently reported its smartphone sales declined more than 50 percent during the first quarter of 2012 compared to the year previous. And LG has said it does not plan to make new Windows Phones because no one is buying them, according to the Korea Herald. “The total unit of Windows Phone sold in the global market is not a meaningful figure,” the company reportedly said.

Microsoft doesn’t appear to be giving up on its new smartphone platform just yet. The next version of Windows Phone is expected to offer deep integration with Windows 8, Microsoft’s upcoming touch-first OS for PCs and tablets, which could help popularize Windows Phone. Cheaply priced devices such as the $50 Samsung Focus 2 could also help the struggling smartphone OS battle back into relevance.

For the moment, however, no matter how you slice it, nobody is buying Windows Phone in the United States even with devices such as the Nokia Lumia 900 (one of PCWorld’s top-rated smartphones) grabbing headlines.

Connect with Ian Paul (@ianpaul) on Twitter and Google+, and with Today@PCWorld on Twitter for the latest tech news and analysis.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255298/windows_phone_smokes_android_iphone_but_no_one_wants_it.html

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03 Apr 12 The sorry state of Android hardware fragmentation


What applications are these people using such that it needs to be written on a per-device level? I’ve got an HTC HD2 running Android 4.0, despite it shipping with Windows Mobile 6.5, and have yet to have an app that didn’t run on it (running WELL is a bit of a different story for graphics intensive games like Temple Run, etc.). I don’t understand why having lots of different hardware is a problem for Android when it isn’t for Windows or Linux.

Wanna know what was REALLY a problem to develop for? Windows Mobile. Even if you only developed for Windows Mobile 6.0, 6.1, and 6.5, it was a nightmare from a hardware perspective. Just those three releases brought us devices with 300MHz CPUs and 128MB of RAM, all the way to 1GHz CPUs and 1GB of RAM. Some had a GPS, some didn’t. Some had Bluetooth, some didn’t. Most had Wi-Fi, some didn’t. Some had infrared, some didn’t. Some had a CompactFlash slot, some didn’t. Some had an SD/MicroSD slot, some didn’t. Some had a cellular baseband in it, some didn’t. Some had a hardware keyboard, some didn’t. Some had 320×240 screens, some had 600×400 screens, some had 800×400 screens.

Android developers can assume that roughly 90% of devices have at least an 800MHz processor, a screen that’s generally the same proportion, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, an on-screen keyboard, and a MicroSD card. While I’m sure there are a handful of exceptions here and there, the dozens of Android running devices I’ve used have all had those specs in common. Just about the only applications I’ve seen that have justifiably needed to be model specific were rooting tools, ports of ClockworkMod, etc. Other than that, well, regression testing on 1400 devices for Angry Birds is a smidge excessive. Again: Windows and Linux do just fine on tens of millions of hardware combinations.

Joey

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/the-sorry-state-of-android-hardware-fragmentation/19427

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