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22 Dec 12 As iPhone Reigns In The U.S., Android Gains Everywhere Else


English: Apple iPhone (left) vs HTC Hero (right)

The iPhone and Android-enabled smartphones. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Apple might have taken a beating on the stock market recently, but new figures should give investors peace of mind — at least temporarily. In the last three months of 2012, Apple achieved its highest ever share of smartphone sales in the United States, with the iPhone taking 53.3%, a 17.5% gain from one year ago, according to Kantar Worldwide ComTech.

The research firm credits the latest iPhone 5 for the sales boost, and notes that Android’s share of U.S. sales slipped by almost 11%. The iPhone essentially took its place in first position.

Great news for Apple, but there’s a caveat: Android’s comparatively cheaper phones are growing everywhere else.

In Europe’s five biggest countries (Britain, Germany, France, Italy and Spain), sales of devices running Google’s mobile operating system stood at 61% in the last three months, up from 51.8% a year ago. Meanwhile the reign in Spain goes to Google, not Apple: Apple’s share is almost non-existent in the Mediterranean country, where its share of smartphone sales is a paltry 4.4%, and Android dominates with 84.1%.

In Australia, Android has raced ahead to claim 58% of smartphone sales, while the iPhone’s share has declined to around 36%. The gap is even wider in Brazil, where Android has leapt to grab 60.7% of sales, while the iPhone has fallen to just 1.6%. Kantar didn’t have growth data for sales in what it called “urban China,” but you can surmise a similar story: Android has 72.2% of the Chinese market, Apple 19.2%. Separate research from IDC also shows the iPhone’s ranking in China falling because of competition from cheaper, local handsets.

One of the big drivers of this international paradox for Apple is Samsung, which replaced Nokia earlier this year as the world’s biggest handset manufacturer. Kantar notes that in the last 12 weeks it had the biggest share of handset sales overall in Europe at 44.3%, while Apple trailed with 25.3%. Rival handset makers HTC, Sony and Nokia are still battling it out for third place.

Nokia may stand the better chance in Europe, depending on how consumers react to its latest Windows Phone 8 models in 2013 and better pricing plans from carriers. Windows Phone, which is primarily available on HTC and Nokia handsets, also benefits from strong resources that Microsoft can plug into marketing and distribution. And Nokia’s Lumia 920 is one of the few smartphones available on the Everything Everywhere (EE) 4G network in Britain.

One upside for Apple is that America isn’t completely saturated with iPhones; Kantar’s Dominic Sunnebo predicts that Apple may have more room to grow Stateside, and that the iPhone would  “make further gains” in December 2012. How long those gains will last is an open question, and comes amid pressure on Apple to release a cheaper version of the iPhone in emerging markets and other parts of the world where the company lags. The iPhone is crucial to the company’s fortunes, accounting for more than 60% of Apple’s group revenues

And there are yet tougher questions: will Apple get by on the resulting slimmer margins, and will Android’s lead overseas be so big that it becomes increasingly difficult to turn around the iPhone’s narrowing market share? We should know by this time next year.

Have a look at Kantar’s figures below – click on the image to enlarge:

Article source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/parmyolson/2012/12/21/as-iphone-reigns-in-the-u-s-android-gains-everywhere-else/

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17 Jun 12 Microsoft brings Kinectimals to Android, is both warm and fuzzy


Microsoft brings Kinectimals to Android, is both warm and fuzzyCatching up with its fellow iOS and Windows Phone platforms, Kinectimals has arrived on Android. It’ll set you back three bucks, but for that you’ll get the chance to play with five different balls of exotic fluff — if you tie it into your Xbox 360 version. Like the other versions, you can to pet them, play with them and generally gaze enraptured at their squishy paws. The integration to Xbox 360 isn’t the deepest we’ve seen, but we’re never going to say no to a bit of inter-platform love. The download’s waiting below.

Article source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/16/microsoft-kinectimals-android/

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17 Jun 12 Microsoft brings Kinectimals to Android, is both warm and fuzzy


Microsoft brings Kinectimals to Android, is both warm and fuzzyCatching up with its fellow iOS and Windows Phone platforms, Kinectimals has arrived on Android. It’ll set you back three bucks, but for that you’ll get the chance to play with five different balls of exotic fluff — if you tie it into your Xbox 360 version. Like the other versions, you can to pet them, play with them and generally gaze enraptured at their squishy paws. The integration to Xbox 360 isn’t the deepest we’ve seen, but we’re never going to say no to a bit of inter-platform love. The download’s waiting below.

Article source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/16/microsoft-kinectimals-android/

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16 Jun 12 Why Android’s Greatest Threat Isn’t Apple – It’s Microsoft


There’s little denying that Apple rules the smartphone world. The company sells just one phone model, yet that sole model constitutes 8.8% – or roughly 1 in 11 – of all worldwide smartphone sales and 73% of profits. iOS is the second most popular smartphone OS in the US after Android with 31.4% of the market (Android has 50.8%). Windows Phone 7, on the other hand, has just 4% of the US smartphone market, yet it’s Microsoft that we have to worry about. We’re witnessing a Kansas City Shuffle; while everybody is looking left, Microsoft is going right.

Microsoft is a lot like a freight train: it may be fat, bloated, and heavy, but once it finally gets up to speed, it’s a force to be reckoned with. There’s certainly something to be said for a company that commands about 90% of the US PC market and 40% of the US console market at a time when consoles are becoming less gamey and more comprehensive-entertainment-centery. That’s without touching on Microsoft’s impending entrance in the tablet game and the upcoming release of Windows RT and Windows 8, nor the early 2013 release of the Xbox 720.

By now, you can probably see where I’m going with this. Odds are very good that your home and work computers both run Windows, and I’m going to guess you use Office on both. Roughly 30 million Xbox 360s have been sold in the US, so I’m going to guess that a fair number of readers may have one of those too. That’s our foundation: the company already has a commanding presence in many corners of consumers’ lives.

But it’s still a bit of a mess. Sure, the 360 has some networked PC integration built in, but any UI or UX consistency between the two is an afterthought, not a perfect fit. Yes, you can use Office on your Windows Phone, but it’s not a great experience. What happens when it all comes together, as the company is doing with its next wave of devices? Windows Phone looks like Windows RT, which looks like Windows 8. I’ll eat my shoes if the 720 doesn’t share the same design language.

wp7-people WinRTTab Win8pc

Left to right: Windows Phone 7, Windows RT (tablet), Windows 8 (PC). Without the subtitle, would you know which was which?

All three of the above, as well as the Xbox 720, show extreme promise. Now stop and consider: what can be done if virtually every internet-connected aspect of your life shares the same platform? Apps can easily be ported, streaming/transferring/syncing could be a breeze, the cloud could be more powerful than ever, and your portable devices can be windows (hah!) into a bigger screen. Your phone and tablet can act as seamless companions to your TV or PC, becoming a complementing screen for auxiliary information or a unique controllers. It’s a lot more fun to play a racing game on your phone or tablet than it is on your PC because you actually have to interact, but you’re still limited to a small screen. Imagine that same interactivity but on your PC or TV screen. The Wii U is child’s play by comparison.

Obviously, there’s a big catch here, and it’s one of MSFT’s most infamous weaknesses: they have to follow through. A lack of corporate focus has often resulted in poor quality for the company in the past, and products/services with a world of potential have been absolutely ruined by a lack of attention to detail. Bill Gates famously sent an email to his senior people absolutely slamming Windows Usability – seriously, it’s like 2 pages long and describes how excruciating Microsoft can make user experience.

Lately, though, the company has been doing pretty damn well, and as previously mentioned, their upcoming products and services show a world of potential. While I don’t think Microsoft’s next wave will be perfect out of the gate, I think they will be impressive enough to drive growth across the board.

Google and Apple offer fantastic products and services, but they don’t command your den, your office, your living room, and your productivity. That’s Microsoft’s Trojan Horse, and that’s why it’s the biggest threat to Android.

Article source: http://www.androidpolice.com/2012/06/16/why-androids-greatest-threat-isnt-apple-its-microsoft/

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14 Jun 12 Android Users: Microsoft Debuts a Version of its My Xbox Live App …


Android-wielding Xbox fans, rejoice! Microsoft debuted a version of its My Xbox Live app for the platform Wednesday. Also released: A significant upgrade to the iOS version of the app.

The Android version of My Xbox Live brings features that iPhone and Windows Phone users have had for awhile.The Android version of My Xbox Live brings features that iPhone and Windows Phone users have had for awhile.The Android app is a bit rough around the edges, but it’s a start. Users will be able to send and receive messages from their Xbox Live accounts, manage their friends list, edit their profile, adjust their avatar, and review achievement information. These features mirror what has already been available to iOS for quite some time.

The company did not say when it anticipated Android users will gain access to more advanced functions, although it did note the app itself will only work on select phones. If you read the app’s page on Google Play, the app is available for most Android 2.2+ smartphones, with WGVA screen resolution or higher.

However, you don’t find out until you attempt to run the app after installing it if your phone doesn’t qualify. That appears to have angered some. You must also, of course, have an Xbox LIVE account to sign in.

My Xbox Live for iOS

The cool new features go to the My Xbox Live for iOS app, where the improvements mirror functions available in Windows Phone’s Xbox Companion app.

Windows Phone users have been able search and control content from their devices, and the iOS app will now be able to do the same. The iOS app now acts a remote which can navigate through the Xbox 360 menus as well as play, pause, rewind, or fast forward through content.

The remote allows you to navigate through menus and content on your Xbox via your iOS device.The remote allows you to navigate through menus and content on your Xbox via your iOS device.The iPad version of the app is also getting a refresh, including Retina Display support and improved sign-in controls.

While this may sound a lot like SmartGlass–Microsoft’s effort to ease the sharing of content across multiple devices — it is not. Instead, this update is more about bringing the feature set of the iOS version of My Xbox Live closer to its Windows Phone counterpart.

“Yes, we do intend to bring Xbox SmartGlass to several platforms over time, but have no details to share right now,” says Xbox programming director Larry Hyrb, better known as “Major Nelson.”

For more tech news and commentary, follow Ed on Twitter at @edoswald, on Facebook, or on Google+.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257567/android_users_microsoft_debuts_a_version_of_its_my_xbox_live_app_for_android.html

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14 Jun 12 Android Users: Microsoft Debuts a Version of its My Xbox Live App for Android


Android-wielding Xbox fans, rejoice! Microsoft debuted a version of its My Xbox Live app for the platform Wednesday. Also released: A significant upgrade to the iOS version of the app.

The Android version of My Xbox Live brings features that iPhone and Windows Phone users have had for awhile.The Android version of My Xbox Live brings features that iPhone and Windows Phone users have had for awhile.The Android app is a bit rough around the edges, but it’s a start. Users will be able to send and receive messages from their Xbox Live accounts, manage their friends list, edit their profile, adjust their avatar, and review achievement information. These features mirror what has already been available to iOS for quite some time.

The company did not say when it anticipated Android users will gain access to more advanced functions, although it did note the app itself will only work on select phones. If you read the app’s page on Google Play, the app is available for most Android 2.2+ smartphones, with WGVA screen resolution or higher.

However, you don’t find out until you attempt to run the app after installing it if your phone doesn’t qualify. That appears to have angered some. You must also, of course, have an Xbox LIVE account to sign in.

My Xbox Live for iOS

The cool new features go to the My Xbox Live for iOS app, where the improvements mirror functions available in Windows Phone’s Xbox Companion app.

Windows Phone users have been able search and control content from their devices, and the iOS app will now be able to do the same. The iOS app now acts a remote which can navigate through the Xbox 360 menus as well as play, pause, rewind, or fast forward through content.

The remote allows you to navigate through menus and content on your Xbox via your iOS device.The remote allows you to navigate through menus and content on your Xbox via your iOS device.The iPad version of the app is also getting a refresh, including Retina Display support and improved sign-in controls.

While this may sound a lot like SmartGlass–Microsoft’s effort to ease the sharing of content across multiple devices — it is not. Instead, this update is more about bringing the feature set of the iOS version of My Xbox Live closer to its Windows Phone counterpart.

“Yes, we do intend to bring Xbox SmartGlass to several platforms over time, but have no details to share right now,” says Xbox programming director Larry Hyrb, better known as “Major Nelson.”

For more tech news and commentary, follow Ed on Twitter at @edoswald, on Facebook, or on Google+.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257567/android_users_microsoft_debuts_a_version_of_its_my_xbox_live_app_for_android.html

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12 Jun 12 Android ICS already offers more than what is coming in iOS 6


Apple officially announced iOS 6 yesterday and while it is a welcome update for iOS that I look forward to installing on my iPad 3, most everything Apple revealed can already be done today on Ice Cream Sandwich Android devices.

Apple does a good job of taking existing technology and features and making it more user friendly (they did it with iOS 5 last year), but ICS took Android a long ways and the experience on the HTC One X is fantastic.

Apple stated there are over 200 new features in iOS 6 and we will have to wait until the fall to see everything. Developers will be loading up beta versions soon so we will see some more discussions on features over the next few weeks and months.

They did reveal several major features and functions at WWDC, so let’s take a look and compare them to what we see with existing Android ICS. You can check out the table below that summarizes the differences, followed by more lengthy discussion and my opinions. Don’t forget that Google revealed ICS last year and is likely to show off Jelly Bean this month at Google I/O.

Maps: Apple has always included a Maps application, based on Google Maps. As we discussed in May, Apple has decided to finally put some effort into navigation (powered by TomTom) and will be rolling out their own mapping solution in iOS 6.

In typical Apple fashion, the application has lots of attractive visuals with good functionality. It is their first attempt so there is still work to be done, but the new Maps does provide for turn-by-turn navigation, traffic monitoring (crowd-sourced like Waze), location-based integration in apps, and some great lock screen capability.

There doesn’t appear to be any offline navigation support, which is something that Google just recently announced for Android devices.

It also appears iOS owners will lose bicycle, pedestrian, and transit functions seen in Google Maps on iOS 5. Google Maps Navigation is a tried and tested service and application that will be tough to beat.

Siri: Siri looks to finally be getting some functionality that it should have had at launch, including the ability to launch apps, real-time sports, movie, and restaurant information and integration, and support from auto manufacturers for true eyes-free usage.

As a sports fan, I liked the demos at WWDC. Then again, I follow the sports I enjoy most with dedicated apps anyway so it isn’t as critical as it was made out to be. These functions are great to see in Siri, but I wonder how many people will use it past the week or two novelty period. I only used Siri on my iPhone 4S for reminders after the novelty wore off and rarely see people talking to their phone so am still not yet sold on the practicality of Siri.

Passbook: Passbook looks like it takes the best from multiple 3rd party apps like TripIt, Starbucks, Flixster, and more to provide one location for storing airline info, store reward cards and more. It is not a payment system application, but seems like it could move that way in the future.

Mail enhancements: I almost fell on the floor laughing when I saw how excited people were about multiple email signatures coming to iOS. You can now have a different signature for each email account on your iOS device, WOW

You can also now finally add attachments from within the email client rather than having to go to the Photos app and then create an email. However, attachment support is still extremely limited due to Apple’s closed approach to the file system. You can attach just photos and only one at a time.

iOS 6 will also include a VIP mailbox so you can filter people’s email that you really want to see. One thing I love about HTC Sense is this same ability to have groups that let you quickly filter your email with the touch of a tab. Again, nothing new or groundbreaking for Android, but nice to see Apple catching up.

Facebook: iOS 5 brought some basic Twitter integration to the platform and now we see Apple including some Facebook support. Windows Phone launched with Facebook support and Android is the king of sharing capability with the most extensive support for sharing across a large number of services.

Notification center: Like other devices have for years, iOS 6 will now enable you to quickly reply with a text message when a call comes in and you don’t want to answer it. There will also be a Do Not Disturb feature that seems very handy.

If you do a quick search in the Play Store you can find several of these same type of apps available now for Android devices. I never gave much thought to it, but I might just try a couple of these out and find one for my HTC One X.

FaceTime over 3G: Since the launch of FaceTime on iOS, people have been asking for the ability to use it over a connection other than WiFi. Other developers provided this capability through their apps, Skype, Tango, and others. Apple will be making carriers happy in iOS 6 if people use it a lot with restricted wireless carrier data caps. Again, it’s another feature that was expected and good to finally see, but I prefer using Skype since it is able to be used with more people across all platforms.

Video stabilization: You will find that iOS 6 helps you reduce shaky videos, something seen on other platforms for some time.

Some other interesting new features include:

  • Guided Access enhancements that will help those with challenges use iOS devices.
  • Game Center improvements. (I never use this so maybe the improvements will have me finally trying it out on my iPad.)
  • Full screen landscape support in Safari. (will help with iPad browsing for sure.)
  • Safari browser syncing. (It’s teason why I use Chrome on my computers and HTC One X.)
  • Photo stream sharing.

iOS 6 is a welcome update for iOS fans. iOS 5 Apple borrowed quite a bit from multiple platforms and improved the user interface elements. It looks like they did the same again, but ICS already has some solid user interface elements for these features and the differentiation isn’t as great as it used to be.

With Google likely to reveal Jelly Bean later this month at Google I/O I can understand why analysts predict iOS to continue with a fairly flat rate of adoption. Microsoft may also hit it out of the park with Windows Phone 8 and hopefully we see some of what they have coming soon at their June developer conference.

I personally find the HTC One X to be a better piece of hardware than the iPhone 4S and with the customizations and useful glanceable widgets I intend to update my new iPad to iOS 6, but skip picking up a new iPhone when they are announced.

It depends on how compelling the new iPhone hardware is, but iOS 6 isn’t compelling enough itself to sway me from Android or Windows Phone.

Related ZDNet and CNET coverage

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/cell-phones/android-ics-already-offers-more-than-what-is-coming-in-ios-6/7769

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12 Jun 12 Apple iOS 6 vs. Android vs. Windows Phone (Comparison Chart)


Apple’s World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC) kicked off today with the unveiling of iOS 6 for the iPhone and iPad. Apple is promising over 200 new features in the latest version of its mobile operating system, but only a few of them were highlighted in the keynote.

June is an exciting month for smartphone fanatics as Microsoft is expected to unveil the next generation of Windows Phone at an event next Wednesday, June 20 while Google is expected to reveal its plans for the next version of Android, codenamed “Jellybean.”

While some of the features Apple announced today already exist on competing platforms, Apple is putting its own twist on these updates. For example, Siri, Apple’s voice-activated virtual assistant, is even smarter now with support for sports, movies, and restaurants. Siri can also directly launch apps, but you still can’t control these third-party apps with your voice.

Apple is also breaking up with Google Maps and launching its own Maps application with iOS 6. It includes local business information, Yelp integration, real-time traffic updates, and turn-by-turn navigation. Naturally, Apple has also added Siri integration to maps so you can ask questions along your journey such as, “Are we there yet?” or “Where’s the next gas station?” Apple has also added a 3D/fly-over mode to its Maps application, which shows you detailed 3D models of buildings and landmarks.


These updates certainly give Microsoft and Android something to chew on. While both competing platforms offer voice-command support, those features are crude in comparison to Siri’s artificial intelligence and natural dictation. Microsoft’s Bing Maps could definitely use a revamp in the next version of Windows Phone as its turn-by-turn directions feature is quite clunky (you must tap your phone at each turn).

We’ll be revisiting this comparison later this month as Microsoft and Google roll out new versions of their respective mobile platforms.

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Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257363/apple_ios_6_vs_android_vs_windows_phone_comparison_chart.html

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08 Jun 12 What Enterprises Should Take Away from IDC’s Latest Smartphone OS Forecast


It would seem foolhardy and stupid to try and guess the final league standings for a sports season four years from now (though the continued embrace of Big Data-based predictive analytics by pro sports teams may change that someday).

Yet, here we have good ol’ IDC stepping up this week with their latest predictions for smartphone operating system market share til 2016.

To be fair, IDC’s (and Gartner’s, and Forrester’s, etc.) forecasts do have more than stats-o-tainment value for those of us who check Techmeme five times daily.

For developers, it helps decide where to invest their time and skills in, and could mean the difference between a healthy income and unemployment several years down the road.

For app makers, it can mean the difference between breaking even and breakaway profits.

Ditto for hardware vendors.

And for enterprises, forecasts like this guide CIOs in making their long-range infrastructure and hiring plans.

And just to refresh your memory, here is IDC’s predictions from 15 months ago, for comparison.

Here are my takeaways with the enterprise in mind:

1) Multiple platforms are here to stay. Companies that are supporting 3-4 platforms today – BlackBerry, iOS, Android, and maybe Windows Mobile if they’re heavy into field service – but wish they weren’t will find no relief, according to IDC’s forecasts. Four years from today, they’ll be supporting Android, iOS, Windows Phone and (probably) BlackBerries.

Enterprises must not only seek out MDM tools that strongly manage all platforms, but also Mobile Application Development Platforms (MADPs) that allow you to write once, run anywhere on the OSes you want to use, with minimum rewrite. Even better would be an overarching platform that synchronizes MDM with MADP to give enterprises maximum control over their mobile infrastructure. Bottom line, you need to adapt as the days of the Windows/BlackBerry duopoly are over.

2) Forget IDC’s wording, Android isn’t “peaking.” According to IDC’s own figures, Android shipments this year will be 1.1 billion phones. That will grow to 1.22 billion Android smartphones in 2016. In other words, Android has neither stalled nor flattened out.

3) Even if Windows Phone has caught up to iOS by 2016, iOS will still be ahead. Even as Windows Phone matches iOS in 2016 shipments, its overall installed base of users will still lag for several smartphone refresh cycles (each of which is about two years). Also, IDC expects most of Windows Phone’s gains to come in emerging markets with Nokia’s help. Nothing wrong with that, except that mobile developers and apps still come from and cater to the developed markets – iOS’s core strength.

4) The big loser in IDC’s revised predictions isn’t iOS (or Symbian), it’s RIM. Whereas IDC once saw RIM still holding 13.7% share of the market by 2015, it now sees it only holding 6% this year, and 5.9% in 2016. “The gulf between the BlackBerry OS and its primary competition will widen over the forecast as the mobile phone market becomes increasingly software/app-oriented and the ‘bring your own device’ enterprise trend proliferates,” says IDC.

5) The forecasts, ultimately, don’t matter to CIOs as much as they would’ve 5-10 years ago. I see a trio of reasons: 1) the short tenure of today’s CIO means many won’t be around when 2016 rolls around; 2) the emergence of BYOD lets organizations avoid having to budget tens of millions of dollars in capital expenditures for mobile hardware; 3) long-range forecasts are less reliable due to the dynamicism of the mobile market. Think of tablets, which have only been around 2.5 years old. Not to be nihilistic, but any forecast today need to be taken with a handful, not a pinch of salt.

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If you want to hear more about where enterprise mobility might be in four years, I’d suggest checking out the Breakfast with Gamechangers Internet radio show next Wednesday June 13 at 11 am ET/8 am PT. SAP President and Corporate Officer Sanjay Poonen will be interviewed by host Bonnie D. Graham.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/sybase/what-enterprises-should-take-away-from-idcs-latest-smartphone-os-forecast/3302

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07 Jun 12 At Best Buy, Lumia Is Selling OK but More Slowly Than Android


Nokia and ATT have aggressively promoted the new Lumia 900 smartphone with a big marketing campaign, but at Best Buy, Lumia sales still pale in comparison to the hottest Android phones, a company executive says.

Scott Anderson, vice president of Best Buy’s mobile group, said in a phone interview that the Lumia 900 was a “very decent seller.” He said, however, that it hadn’t sold nearly as well as Android phones like HTC’s Evo 4G LTE on Sprint or the new Samsung Galaxy S III, which will be available for all four major United States carriers.

The Lumia 900 features Windows Phone 7, Microsoft’s mobile operating system, which is less well known than Google’s Android and Apple’s iOS. Mr. Anderson said  he thought a lot of customers were waiting for the release of Windows Phone 8, the next version of the Windows mobile software.

Best Buy, the nation’s biggest electronics chain, is in the unique position of selling flagship handsets for each cellular network — unlike the carriers, whose stores offer only phones that work on their own networks.

Mr. Anderson said he could not disclose specific sales numbers, but he said presales for the Galaxy S III, due out this month, exceeded expectations, and presales for the Evo 4G LTE made it the best-selling Sprint handset at Best Buy. He called the releases of those two phones “major iconic launches” because Best Buy employees across the country had received extensive training with those products and stirred up buzz about them, and because the Galaxy S III was the first phone the store has sold that is coming out on all four big American carriers.

Some recent statistics have shown that Android sales are slowing compared to years past, in part because the iPhone became available on multiple American carriers last year.  Mr. Anderson said he saw no such trend at Best Buy.  “We’re not seeing the decline in Android that I also read about online,” he said. “We continue to have a lot of great successes with the Android launches.”

The sales performance of the Lumia 900 is important for Nokia, as it could determine the struggling handset maker’s fate in the phone business. The company’s share of the phone market has been declining rapidly as Apple and the manufacturers of Android phones have dominated smartphone sales. In April, Samsung dethroned Nokia as the world’s No. 1 maker of mobile phones. Incidentally, Standard Poor’s downgraded Nokia’s bonds to junk status, because sales of its older phones had fallen so significantly.

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/06/best-buy-nokia-lumia-900/

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